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This question relates to a comment in another posting here: Cancelling an Entity Framework Query

I will reproduce the code example from there for clarity:

    var thread = new Thread((param) =>
    {
        var currentString = param as string;

        if (currentString == null)
        {
            // TODO OMG exception
            throw new Exception();
        }

        AdventureWorks2008R2Entities entities = null;
        try // Don't use using because it can cause race condition
        {
            entities = new AdventureWorks2008R2Entities();

            ObjectQuery<Person> query = entities.People
                .Include("Password")
                .Include("PersonPhone")
                .Include("EmailAddress")
                .Include("BusinessEntity")
                .Include("BusinessEntityContact");
            // Improves performance of readonly query where
            // objects do not have to be tracked by context
            // Edit: But it doesn't work for this query because of includes
            // query.MergeOption = MergeOption.NoTracking;

            foreach (var record in query 
                .Where(p => p.LastName.StartsWith(currentString)))
            {
                // TODO fill some buffer and invoke UI update
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (entities != null)
            {
                entities.Dispose();
            }
        }
    });

thread.Start("P");
// Just for test
Thread.Sleep(500);
thread.Abort();

I can't make sense of the comment that says

Don't use using because it can cause race condition

entities is a local variable and won't be shared if the code is re-entered on another thread, and within the same thread it would seem perfectly safe (and indeed equivalent to the given code) to assign it inside a "using" statement in the usual way, rather than doing things manually with the try/finally. Can anyone enlighten me?

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11  
You should ask the original author. It makes no sense to me. –  Jon Skeet Feb 12 '13 at 10:43
    
Why don't you ask the creator of that code? (FTFY) –  sloth Feb 12 '13 at 10:43
    
That was my first thought, but I couldn't find a way to contact him unfortunately, no email on his blog and no way of sending a personal message on here or on the MSDN forums that I could fathom (but please point me in the right direction if I'm being dim and missed it!) –  Mike Nunan Feb 12 '13 at 12:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 32 down vote accepted

Yeah, there is a possible race in the using statement. The C# compiler transforms

using (var obj = new Foo()) {
    // statements
}

to:

var obj = new Foo();
try {
   // statements
}
finally {
   if (obj != null) obj.Dispose();
}

The race occurs when the thread is aborted right between the obj assignment statement and the try block. Extremely small odds but not zero. The object won't be disposed when that happens. Note how he rewrote that code by moving the assignment inside the try block so this race cannot occur. Nothing actually goes fundamentally wrong when the race occurs, disposing objects is not a requirement.

Having to choose between making thread aborts marginally more efficient and writing using statements by hand, you should first opt for not getting in the habit of using Thread.Abort(). I can't recommend actually doing this, the using statement has additional safety measures to ensure accidents don't happen, it makes sure that the original object gets disposed even when the object is re-assigned inside the using statement. Adding catch clauses is less prone to accidents as well. The using statement exists to reduce the likelihood of bugs, always use it.


Noodling on a bit about this problem, the answer is popular, there's another common C# statement that suffers from the exact same race. It looks like this:

lock (obj) {
    // statements
}

Translated to:

Monitor.Enter(obj);
// <=== Eeeek!
try {
    // statements
}
finally {
    Monitor.Exit(obj);
}

Exact same scenario, the thread abort can strike after the Enter() call and before entering the try block. Which prevents the Exit() call from being made. This is way nastier than a Dispose() call that isn't made of course, this is almost certainly going to cause deadlock. The problem is specific to the x64 jitter, the sordid details are described well in this Joe Duffy blog post.

It is very hard to reliably fix this one, moving the Enter() call inside the try block can't solve the problem. You cannot be sure that the Enter call was made so you cannot reliably call the Exit() method without possibly triggering an exception. The Monitor.ReliableEnter() method that Duffy was talking about did eventually happen. The .NET 4 version of Monitor got a TryEnter() overload that takes a ref bool lockTaken argument. Now you know it is okay to call Exit().

Well, scary stuff that goes BUMP in the night when you are not looking. Writing code that's safely interruptable is hard. You'd be wise to never assume that code that you didn't write got all of this taken care of. Testing such code is extremely difficult since the race is so rare. You can never be sure.

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Thanks Hans (and thanks also to everyone else for your responses). So it's a non-pathological case but does indeed qualify as a race condition if one is being precise about it. Re the use of Thread.Abort(), I fully agree that it's best avoided but in this case there is no other option really, Entity Framework 4.x doesn't support interrupting queries and I have the same issue as the OP of the other question because I'm firing off queries in response to user actions that need to be interrupted early if the user does something else. –  Mike Nunan Feb 12 '13 at 13:05
2  
I'll have to defer to common wisdom about using EF. But there's an enormous Red Flag in your comment. "Doesn't support interrupting queries" is just a nice way of saying "doesn't support thread aborts". If EF actually did support thread interrupts then adding an way to interrupt queries would not have been a problem. And would have been added to the api, it is an obviously desirable feature. You are definitely playing with fire. –  Hans Passant Feb 12 '13 at 13:12
    
Yes, they have added it in EF 6.x, but that is in beta and there is no support for the Oracle client library we are using, so I am stuck with this hack for now. I was being inexact when I said "interrupting queries" - what I really mean is there is no proper async/task-style cancellation so you are stuck with Thread.Abort() if you are not willing to let queries run to completion even when the results have become irrelevant. –  Mike Nunan Feb 12 '13 at 13:15
    
"Nothing actually goes fundamentally wrong when the race occurs, disposing objects is not a requirement." The one time I would disagree with this statement is if the constructor were to allocate or open up some external resource, like a pooled database connection or some such. In that case, there would be one less connection in the pool available to other threads. Do that enough times and you would no longer be able to obtain a connection to the database. In general, however, I wouldn't worry about it. –  Tony Vitabile Dec 16 '13 at 13:37

Very strange, cause using is only syntax sugar for try - finally block.

From MSDN:

You can achieve the same result by putting the object inside a try block and then calling Dispose in a finally block; in fact, this is how the using statement is translated by the compiler.

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Depending on whether you use using or explicitly try/finally you can have slightly different code using the sample code you will have

    AdventureWorks2008R2Entities entities = null;
    try // Don't use using because it can cause race condition
    {
        entities = new AdventureWorks2008R2Entities();
        ...
    } finally {
    } 

substituting that with a using statement it could look like

   using(var entities = new AdventureWorks2008R2Entities()){
      ...
   }

which accordig do §8.13 of the specification will be expanded to

    AdventureWorks2008R2Entities entities = new AdventureWorks2008R2Entities();
    try
    {
        ...
    } finally {
    } 

Therefor the only real difference is that the assignment is not within the try/finally block but that has no consequence on which race conditions could occur (aside from thread abort inbetween the assignement and the try block as Hans also notes)

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That comment doesn't make any sense as a using statement will be translated to a try/finally block by the compiler. Since 'entities' will not be used outside of the scope, it's easier to use a using statment as this will automatically dispose of the resources.

You can read more about this on MSDN: using Statement (C# Reference).

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