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in Scala2.10.0 REPL

Welcome to Scala version 2.10.0 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.7.0_13).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated. 
Type :help for more information.

scala> case class A private(i:Int)
defined class A

scala> A(1)
res0: A = A(1)

But if compile

$ scala -version
Scala code runner version 2.10.0 -- Copyright 2002-2012, LAMP/EPFL
$ cat Main.scala 
package foo

case class A private (i:Int)

object Main extends App{
  println(A(1))
}

$ scalac Main.scala 
Main.scala:6: error: constructor A in class A cannot be accessed in object Main
  println(A(1))
          ^
one error found

A.apply(1) is compile error.

is this Scala2.10.0 REPL bug?

FYI Scala2.9.2 REPL is following

Welcome to Scala version 2.9.2 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.7.0_13).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> case class A private(i:Int)
defined class A

scala> A(1)
<console>:10: error: constructor A in class A cannot be accessed in object $iw
              A(1)
              ^
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3 Answers 3

This definitely looks like a REPL bug.

Note that the constructor is correctly marked as private (in other words, new A(1) does not compile, as expected), it is only the factory (A.apply) that is wrongly public.

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I see... You think you're calling the constructor when you write A(1). You're not. You're calling the factory added for you in the automatically generated (public) companion object and its public apply method.

Addendum

My day to be repeatedly wrong…

In the 2.10.0 REPL:

scala> object REPL { case class CC1 private(i: Int); val cc1_1 = CC1(23) }
<console>:7: error: constructor CC1 in class CC1 cannot be accessed in object REPL
       object REPL { case class CC1 private(i: Int); val cc1_1 = CC1(23) }
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1  
I don't think he mixes the factory with the constructor, given that the title is "scala case class private apply method( repl bug ?)". It is actually the scala compiler/REPL that is confusing and talks about constructor when really we are trying to call the factory. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 12 '13 at 17:20
    
@RégisJean-Gilles: He does. You only use the constructor directly when you use the new keyword. –  Randall Schulz Feb 12 '13 at 17:31
1  
I think you're missing the point. This is a case class. Making the constructor private is supposed to make the corresponding factory private, too. Which is exactly what happens when you compile his code snippet, but the behaviour is for some reason different in the REPL. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 12 '13 at 17:43

The REPL has one huge semantic difference w.r.t. the ordinary compiler.

Consider what it means to be able to do this:

scala> val v1 = 23
v1: Int = 23

scala> val v1 = 42
v1: Int = 42

Could you do that in compiled Scala code? Of course not, it would be a prohibited double definition.

How does the REPL do this? In effect every line you enter is in a progressively more nested scope. The appearance of redefinition is actual shadowing. It's as if you did this:

object REPL1 {
  val v1 = 23
  object REPL2 {
    val v1 = 42
    object REPL3 {
      // Next REPL line here...
    }
  }
}

So, how do you get companions? Put an explicit object (or other scope-forming construct) around them. And remember, no blank lines. The REPL will stop accepting input for a given "line" or "block" when you do.

share|improve this answer
    
gist.github.com/4770890 –  Kenji Yoshida Feb 12 '13 at 16:00
    
What's your point? That fails to compile as Scala outside the REPL, too. –  Randall Schulz Feb 12 '13 at 16:18
    
@Mef: Wow... I totally failed to make my point by using v2! Thanks for fixing that. –  Randall Schulz Feb 12 '13 at 17:07
1  
I think that @Kenji Yoshida's point is precisely that his gist, which mimics what the REPL does, fails to compile outside the REPL too. Or in other words, the nested scopes are irrelevant to his question. In addition, you explain how to define companion objects inside the REPL, but he does't do this: there is only one case class in his code, so the companion object is actually automatically generated. As a final note, now you can just use the :paste command when in this situation. –  Régis Jean-Gilles Feb 12 '13 at 17:25
    
Yes. I answered the wrong question the first time. The second answer is to the point (down-votes notwithstanding...). –  Randall Schulz Feb 12 '13 at 17:32

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