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I've got a global function that copies relevant bits of one object (or type Source) to another (of type Target), like so:

template<typename Source , typename Target>
void partialCopy( Source& source , Target& target )
{
    // perform copy
}

The problem I find with global functions is that, unlike member functions, it is not instantly clear when coding which of the two arguments is the source and which is the target. Therefore I would like to have a member function partialCopy() in every class like so:

struct Foo
{
    template<typename T>
    void partialCopy( T& target )
    {
        ::partialCopy( *this , target );
    }
};

The problem now is that the member function has to be copied to dozens of classes. Is this a tolerable case of copy and paste programming? I've considered putting partialCopy in a header file partialCopy.h and using the preprocessor include to 'inject' it into each class, like so:

struct Foo
{
    #include "partialCopy.h"
};


Foo f;
Bar b;
f.partialCopy( b );

Although this works I've never seen it done anywhere and don't know if its unacceptable.

I've already tried putting the partialCopy member function in a common base class and inheriting it but this doesn't work because the this keyword would then refer to the base class and not the derived class.

Is there an even better alternative? Please advise.

Edit

John's suggestion(in a thread that's been deleted) that I perform a static_cast to the derived class in a CRTP base class works nicely. @John please post this an answer and I will mark it as such.

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7  
Passing source as const reference would make it clear that it's the source. – Henrik Feb 12 '13 at 12:13

I am posting this as an answer, because in my opinion it's appropriate. Henrik commented first, though. (However, this was also my first thought :))

const-reference

Use const& (const-reference) for source parameter. That way it's easily distinguishable from the target.

The added benefit is that it will verify and ensure const-correctness of your partial-copy function.

rvalue-reference

You might also think about overloading it for Source&&. If there are some buffers that are copied directly, your function might take use of it.

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Can't use &&. Not allowed to use C++11 yet. We've got to stick with VS 2008 for legacy reasons. – Olumide Feb 12 '13 at 12:24
    
@Olumide Well, it isn't required, of course. – Bartek Banachewicz Feb 12 '13 at 12:26

I would suggest overloading the stream operators for this.

E.g.

template<typename Source , typename Target>
void partialCopy(Source& source, Target& target)
{
    // perform copy
}

effectively becomes:

template<typename Source , typename Target>
void operator>>(const Source& source, Target& target)
{
    // perform copy
}

(also note that the Source parameter is now a const&, for clarity.

So you could simply write

Foo f;
Bar b;
f >> b;

Makes it much clearer what the source and target objects are.

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2  
I doubt however that the code meaning is clearer this way. – Bartek Banachewicz Feb 12 '13 at 12:17
1  
I voted for this solution (too) not because I think it's a great idea to implement, but because it shows lateral thinking and a truly different approach. Well done. – John Zwinck Feb 12 '13 at 12:19
1  
I think this solution as an abuse of operator overloading. Its not intuitive what it should mean and it can be problematic when other overloads with different meaning exists for one of the types. – Jan Herrmann Feb 12 '13 at 12:22
    
I agree that it might be ambiguous in case both source and target are template typenames, however, depends on how you structure the code. – kfunk Feb 12 '13 at 12:25
    
@kfunk which will make it absolutely usesless for generic programming. – Jan Herrmann Feb 12 '13 at 12:42

I'm a bit late with this answer, but I thought you might be interested in a solution using CRTP as a clean alternative to copy-paste programming:

The problem now is that the member function has to be copied to dozens of classes. Is this a tolerable case of copy and paste programming? I've considered putting partialCopy in a header file partialCopy.h and using the preprocessor include to 'inject' it into each class [...].

Instead of copying or #including the code, consider the following:

// common code:
<template typename T>
class PartialCopyImplementer
{
public:
    template<typename D>
    void partialCopy(D& destination)
    {
        // ::partialCopy( *this , target );
    }
};

// concrete implementations
class Foo1 : public PartialCopyImplementer<Foo1> // CRTP implementation
{
// ...
};

// concrete implementations
class Foo2 : public PartialCopyImplementer<Foo2> // CRTP ensures Foo1 and Foo2
                                                 // do not have a common base
{
// ...
};
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The problem here is that the this in the base class refers to the derived refers to the derived class and not the base class so a static_cast is needed. PS: @John has previously hinted at this solution. – Olumide Feb 15 '13 at 22:08

The cleanest way would probably just be to leave partialCopy as a free function an use it that way. There is nothing inherently wrong with that, for example all the function in the standard libraries <algorithm> header are free function that will be used with objects.

It is also not really much clearer which of foo.partialCopy(bar) is the source and which the destination. Does partialCopy copy from or to bar? Generally it is useful to look at the documentation / function declaration in such cases. If you have clear names for the parameters and make them const when appropriat,e it should be pretty clear which way the objects get copied.

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What about:

template<class T>
struct from_impl
{
  T const& from;
  from_impl(T const& f) 
    : from(f)
  {}
};

template<class T>
from_impl<T> from(T const& f) {
  return from_impl(f);
}

template<class T>
struct to_impl
{
  T& to;
  to_impl(T& t) 
    : to(t)
  {}
};

template<class T>
to_impl<T> to(T& t) {
  return to_impl(t);
}
template<class T>
void to(T const&); // prevent using  with non-const values

template<class Source,class Target>
void partial_copy(from_impl<Source> source, to_impl<Target> target)
{
   // use source.from and target.to to perform copy
}

// usage:
T1 object1;
T2 object2;

partial_copy(from(object1),to(object2));

This makes very clear what you want to do. from_impl and to_impl work like a kind of reference and from and to work as factory functions for easy usage. You could also try to implement something like.

partial_copy.from(Source).to(Target);
partial_copy(Source)->_(Target);

But normaly this is a lot of writing. Simply put partial_copy in its own namespace to prevent name clashes, let users make their own overload for customisation and use const& for signaling what source and destination are.

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