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Why second line of this code in Java throws ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException?

String filename = "D:/some folder/001.docx";
String extensionRemoved = filename.split(".")[0];

While below works:

String driveLetter = filename.split("/")[0];

I use Java 7.

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marked as duplicate by Mark Rotteveel, Pshemo, Laurent Etiemble, borrible, EdChum Feb 13 '13 at 9:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Doesn't split use a regex string? In that case "." means any character. –  Snps Feb 12 '13 at 12:53
    
...and it's a DOUBLE backslash to delimit. –  Steve Dec 6 '13 at 5:41

4 Answers 4

You need to escape the dot if you want to split on a literal dot:

String extensionRemoved = filename.split("\\.")[0];

Otherwise you are splitting on the regex ., which means "any character".
Note the double backslash needed to create a single backslash in the regex.

Why you are getting an out of bounds exception is beyond me; AFAIK split() always returns at least one element, even if it is the whole input string in the case of no split found.

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I believe you should escape the dot. Try:

String filename = "D:/some folder/001.docx";
String extensionRemoved = filename.split("\\.")[0];

Otherwise dot is interpreted as any character in regular expressions.

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This is because . is a reserved character in regular expression, representing any character. Instead, we should use the following statement:

String extensionRemoved = filename.split("\\.")[0];
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"." is a special character in java. You have to use "\." to escape this character :

final String extensionRemoved = filename.split("\\.")[0];

I hope this helps

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