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I have TONS of instance methods, all sharing the same instance variables. Since the class became huge, I split the methods into around 50 modules. And then the class that is left is including all those 50 modules.

I ended up with an unbelievable ugly code which is full of instance methods like "module_name_method_name" to avoid collisions of method names. The problem is that each Module might have similar (similar, not same) functionality (in turn similar method names).

My current code looks like this:

The modules:

module Toyota
  def toyota_method1;@foo...;end
  def toyota_method2;@foo...;end
  ....
end

module Ford
  def ford_method1;@foo...;end
  def ford_method2;@foo...;end
  ....
end

.... around 50 such modules

class Cars
  include Toyota
  include Ford
  include ...

  def foo
    @foo = "bar"
    @bar = "foo"
    ...

    toyota_method1
    ford_method2
    toyota_method2
    ...
  end
end

How could I design my code better? The most important thing is that ALL instance methods need to share the same instance variables.. or at least somehow have access to the same data!

EDIT: I just came up with this myself:

class Toyota
  attr_accessor :foo

  def method1
    puts @foo
  end
end

class Ford
  attr_accessor :foo

  def method1
    puts @foo
  end
end

class Cars
  def foo
    @foo = "bar"

    toyota = Toyota.new
    toyota.foo = @foo
    toyota.method1

    ford = Ford.new
    ford.foo = @foo
    ford.method1
  end
end

cars = Cars.new
cars.foo

In fact it solves the ugly method name problem, but now I'm dealing with new problems: the variable @foo might be quite large and it's duplicating itself 50 times (or more) into memory (since I have 50 such classes).

Any other solutions?

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Some more concrete examples of what is going would help - I'm struggling to think of what constraints require you to have this design –  Frederick Cheung Feb 12 '13 at 19:02

1 Answer 1

It's not only duplicating 50 times or more, its duplicated per instance since it's an instance variable. From what I can tell about your code, and you have to correct me if I'm wrong, it would be best for you to use inheritance along with variable sharing on the class level. This may not work if your car class really needs to know all the different methods from all kind of models it might be, but then I would say you've done something inherently wrong from the beginning. So let's look at inheritance:

class Car
  attr_accessor :foo

  # lets you initialize attributes via a hash
  #
  def initialize attrs={}
    super()

    attrs.each do |att, value|
      self.send(:"#{att}=", value)
    end
  end

end

Inherit Toyota from Car:

class Toyota < Car

  def method1
    # do what you want to do in this method
  end

end

Same for Ford:

class Ford < Car

  def method1
    # do what you want to do in this method
  end

end

Like this you won't have to put namespaces in front of your method:

Ford.new(:foo => 'fordfoo').foo #=> will put out «fordfoo»
Toyota.new(:foo => 'toyotafoo').foo #=> will put out «toyotafoo»


Sharing across classes

Now, if foo is Shared across all cars, you can make it either a) a constant on the car class if it is static:

class Car
  FOO = 'bar'

  def put_foo
    puts FOO
  end
end

Like this, all Instances of Car, Toyota or Ford will have access to the static constant FOO, which will only exist one time in memory:

Toyota.new.put_foo #=> 'bar'

If foo has to be assignable and only has to exist one time for the whole inheritance tree, use class variables:

 class Car

   class << self
     def foo= data
       @@foo = data
     end
   end

   def foo= data
     self.class.foo = data
   end

   def foo
     @@foo
   end

 end

Now @@foo only exists once for the inheritance tree, so if you do this:

 car    = Car.new
 toyota = Toyota.new

 toyota.foo = 'toyota'
 car.foo #=> 'toyota'

This can lead to serious problems if you're not paying attention, but if foo must be the same anyway for all classes, it's the way to go. There are also some issues with Thread Safety you will have to address (with Mutex) working with class variables.

If Car, Toyota and Ford all have different foo, but the instances of each class need to share the same foo (so it is 3 foo's in total), use class instance variables:

class Car
  class << self
    def foo= data
      @foo = data
    end

    def foo
      @foo
    end
  end

  def foo= data
    self.class.foo = data
  end

  def foo
    self.class.foo
  end
end

Like this you will get:

car = Car.new
car.foo = 'bla'

toyota = Toyota.new
toyota.foo #=> is nil
toyota.foo = 'bar'

car.foo #=> still 'bla'
toyota.foo #=> is 'bar'

These are the ways to share the same data across instances.

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