Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

With multiple threads (std::async) sharing an instance of the following class through a shared_ptr, is it possible to get a segmentation fault in this part of the code? If my understanding of std::mutex is correct, mutex.lock() causes all other threads trying to call mutex.lock() to block until mutex.unlock() is called, thus access to the vector should happen purely sequentially. Am I missing something here? If not, is there a better way of designing such a class (maybe with a std::atomic_flag)?

#include <mutex>
#include <vector>
class Foo
{
   private:
      std::mutex mutex;
      std::vector<int> values;
   public:
      Foo();
      void add(const int);
      int get();
};
Foo::Foo() : mutex(), values() {}
void Foo::add(const int value)
{
   mutex.lock();
   values.push_back(value);
   mutex.unlock();
}
int Foo::get()
{
   mutex.lock();
   int value;
   if ( values.size() > 0 )
   {
      value = values.back();
      values.pop_back();
   }
   else
   {
      value = 0;
   }
   mutex.unlock();
   return value;
}

Disclaimer: The default value of 0 in get() is intended as it has a special meaning in the rest of the code.

Update: The above code is exactly as I use it, except for the typo push_Back of course.

share|improve this question
    
where is the seg fault? – thang Feb 12 '13 at 13:51
3  
I don't see a problem with this class, but you should use lock_guard<> or unique_lock<> to acquire mutexes and automatically release when the RAII wrapper goes out of scope. Are you showing the entire class definition? – Andy Prowl Feb 12 '13 at 13:51
1  
Also, what are you doing with objects of this class apart from accessing them concurrently? Are you copying them around? – Andy Prowl Feb 12 '13 at 13:53
    
Updated question. @AndyProwl: There is just one object of this class, shared_ptr is just for convenience in the early phase of development. @ hmjd: yep except for such typos, thanks – stefan Feb 12 '13 at 13:55
    
@stefan: Can you show the client code? – Andy Prowl Feb 12 '13 at 13:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Other than not using RAII to acquire the lock and using size() > 0 instead of !empty(), the code looks fine. This is exactly how a mutex is meant to be used and this is the quintessential example of how and where you need a mutex.

As Andy Prowl pointed out, instances can't be copy constructed or copy assigned.

share|improve this answer
2  
That will cause a compile-time error should anyone abuse the interface. It won't compile anyway, because having std::mutex as member prevents from generating default copy constructor and assignment operator. – Fiktik Feb 12 '13 at 14:04
    
@Fiktik Oh, good point. – David Schwartz Feb 12 '13 at 14:31

Here is the "improved" version:

#include <mutex>
#include <vector>
class Foo {
   private:
      std::mutex mutex;
      typedef std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock;
      std::vector<int> values;
   public:
      Foo();
      void add(int);
      int get();
};
Foo::Foo() : mutex(), values() {}
void Foo::add(int value) {
   lock _(mutex);
   values.push_back(value);
}
int Foo::get() {
   lock _(mutex);
   int value = 0;
   if ( !values.empty() )
   {
      value = values.back();
      values.pop_back();
   }
   return value;
}

with RAII for acquiring the mutex etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.