Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Say I have an array declared as:

int* array;

and I fill the array with however many integers.

If I later say

array = NULL;

does this free the memory that the numbers in array occupied, or does it just make the array unusable while the memory still lingers?

share|improve this question
    
It will be a memory leak if you used new. –  Simon G. Feb 12 '13 at 14:10
    
In short: No! Use delete, if the memory was heap allocated (using new). –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 12 '13 at 14:12
6  
int* array; is not an array in any way, shape, or form. –  Joseph Mansfield Feb 12 '13 at 14:15

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you allocated the memory using new [] (more likely, since the name of the variable is array) or new, this will result in a memory leak.

Setting the pointer to NULL will not release the memory, only reassign the pointer. In other words, you will lose any chance to refer to the previously allocated memory.

Use delete[] to release memory allocated with new[], and delete to release memory allocated with new.

However, consider not using raw pointers and manual memory management at all, they are most often not needed and error-prone. The C++ Standard Library comes with collections and smart pointers that perform memory management under the hood and keep you safe from this kind of mistakes.

share|improve this answer

int* array; is not an array, it's a pointer. You have no array at this point. You can't start doing array[0] = 5; or anything because it doesn't even point at a valid int object, let alone an array of ints.

An array is declared by doing:

int array[5];

This array does have 5 objects ready for you to start assigning to. However, this array must not be deleted. The array was not dynamically allocated.

However, if you were to have done int* array = new int[5];, you would by dynamically allocating an array of 5 ints and getting a pointer to the first element in that array. In this case, you must delete[] array;. If you don't and only set the pointer to NULL or nullptr, you will only leak memory.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a very sensible and pertinent answer. –  Kerrek SB Feb 12 '13 at 14:29

When you use the code

int *array;
array = NULL;

you have initialized the pointer. When you assign data to *array

int *array;
array[1] = 3;

you get an undefined behavior, but in most cases an access violation. When you allocate memory before writing and assign NULL to the pointer

int *array;
array = new int[3];
array[0] = 2;
array[2] = 4;
array = NULL;

you get a memory leak. Everything should be fine, when you delete the data:

int *array;
array = new int[3];
array[0] = 2;
array[2] = 4;
delete[] array;
array = NULL;
share|improve this answer

Setting the array to NULL does not free the memory.

Weather it is usable will depend on the surrounding code and how array is initialized. But you have not provided that information so anything else would be speculation.

Note it is unusual to use pointers in modern C++ code.
You should be looking to use a more appropriate structure. What that is will depend on what your usage us. Based on the name alone array. You should probably be using std::vector<int> (or std::array<int> C++11) or even a plain old C array int array[5].

share|improve this answer

it will leak the memory and it will only be freed when the process exits. There is every chance that a segmenation fault may occur.

share|improve this answer

If you have:

int *array = new int[10];

you need to use

delete [] array;

to free the memory.

share|improve this answer

Basically follow the rule: Whenever allocating with new XXX deallocate with delete XXXor for array allocation delete [] XXX.

If you just use array = NULL, you only set the pointer to NULL and you will have a memory leak.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.