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So I have two tables. One with amount of shares that people have:

Person_ID ||  Shares
1         ||  100
2         ||  150
3         ||  315
4         ||  75
5         ||  45
...

and another with info whether a person is present (there are two columns specifying that) and what group does he belongs to:

Person_id || barcode_presence || manual_presence || group_id
1         || NULL             || 1               || NULL
2         || 1                || NULL            || 1
3         || 1                || 0               || 2
4         || 0                || NULL            || 1
5         || 1                || 0               || 1
...

I need to find out the sum of all present and sum of all absent shares in every single group (NULL group is also a group).

The thing I cannot figure out is that whether the person is present or absent is figured out by the combination of two columns (barcode_presence and manual_presence):

if manual_presence = 1 --> present

else if (manual_presence = NULL and barcode_presence = 1) --> present

everything else is absent.

Thats what i've got so far.

SELECT  presence_list.Person_id, presence_list.person_name, 
presence_list.barcode_presence, presence_list.manual_presence,
presence_list.group_id, people_data.Share 
, sum(people_data.Share)

FROM presence_list

INNER JOIN people_data
ON presence_list.Person_id = people_data.Person_ID

WHERE meeting_id = 1 AND voting_id = 0 
GROUP BY presence_list.group_id,  
barcode_presence,
manual_presence
ORDER BY presence_list.group_id
;

But obviously that does not give me the desired result. it groups by every possible combination of group_id, barcode_presence and manual_presence like following:

Person_id || barcode_presence || manual_presence || group_id || share || sum(shares)
1         || NULL             || 1               || NULL     || 100   || 100
2         || 1                || NULL            || 1        || 150   || 150
4         || 0                || NULL            || 1        || 75    || 75
5         || 1                || 0               || 1        || 45    || 45
3         || 1                || 0               || 2        || 315   || 315

So i'm looking for a way to (in this case) connect person with id 4 and 5, because they are both absent and they are from the same group, like this:

Person_id || barcode_presence || manual_presence || group_id || share || sum(shares)
1         || NULL             || 1               || NULL     || 100   || 100
2         || 1                || NULL            || 1        || 150   || 150
5         || 1                || 0               || 1        || 45    || **120**
3         || 1                || 0               || 2        || 315   || 315

I've tried using HAVING clause but I didn't found a way for it to handle complex expressions like manual_presence = 1 OR (manual_presence is null AND barcode_presence = 1)

Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated! thanks beforehand!

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Which DBMS are you using? Oracle? Postgres? –  a_horse_with_no_name Feb 12 '13 at 14:17
    
I'm using MySQL. –  Egor Feb 12 '13 at 14:20

3 Answers 3

You can use a case to make a group for present and non-present people:

select  group_id
,       case 
        when barcode_presence = 1 and manual_presence = 1 then 1
        else 0
        end
,       sum(share)
from    presence_list pl
join    people_data pd
on      pl.person_id = pd.person_id
group by 
        group_id
,       case 
        when barcode_presence = 1 and manual_presence = 1 then 1
        else 0
        end
order by 
        group_id
share|improve this answer
    
Thats a good solution, thanks! I ended up using another one, but nonetheless this one was very helpful! –  Egor Feb 12 '13 at 15:18

if only one of the two columns can ever be populated, Use coalesce...

 Group By group_id, Coalesce(barcode_presence, manual_presence)

if not, (can, say, the barcode_presence = 1 and the presence = 0?), then yu need to decide what groups of possible combinations of values you want to group by, and just group by an expression that does that... drawing a chart of value combinations may help...

                barcode value     
 manual     Null      0        1
   Null     GrpA    GrpA     GrpB
     0      GrpC    GrpC     GrpB
     1      GrpB    GrpB     GrpB

say you want to group by those where both are 0, and all the others, then you would write...

 Group By group_id, case When isnull(barcode_presence, 0) = 0 
                          And isnull(manual_presence, 0) = 0 Then 0 Else 1 End
share|improve this answer

If I understand correctly, I think producing two columns is the way to go:

select pd.group_id,
       SUM(isPresent * pd.shares) as PresentShares,
       SUM((1 - isPresent)*pd.shares) as NotPresentShares
from (select pl.*,
             (case when manual_presence = 1 or 
                        manual_precence is null and barcode_presence = 1
                   then 1 else 0
              end) as IsPresent
           end
      from presence_list pl
     ) pl join
     people_data pd
     on pl.Person_id = pd.Person_ID
group by pd.group_id

The subquery just applies your logic to create a flag that is 1 for present and 0 for not-present. Conveniently, when coded this way, "1 - IsPresent" is 1 for not-present and 0 for present.

This value then used in the aggregation to aggregate the shares. You could have the outer query be:

select group_id, IsPresent, sum(pd.shares)
from . . .
group by group_id, IsPresent

If you really wanted the values on separate rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Great solution! That is exactly what i need, however, I've encoutered a problem and I'm quite puzzled about it. Thats what the script outputs. <br/> Group_id || PresentShares || NotPresentShares<br/> 5 || 3380 || 10140<br/> However, I know for a fact that there are only 2 people in Group 5 and each of them has exactly 3380 shares. Any idea why it counted NotPresentShares 3 times? –  Egor Feb 12 '13 at 15:24

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