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I am trying to find a way to selectively remove newline characters from a file. I have no issues removing all of them..but I need some to remain.

Here is the example of the bad input file. Note that rows with Permit ID COO789 & COO012 have newlines embedded in the description field that I need to remove.

"Permit Id","Permit Name","Description","Start Date","End Date"
"COO123","Music Festival",,"02/12/2013","02/12/2013"
"COO456","Race Weekend",,"02/23/2013","02/23/2013"
"COO789","Basketball Final 8 Championships - Media vs. Politicians
Skills Competition",,"02/22/2013","02/22/2013"
"COO012","Dragonboat race 
weekend",,"05/11/2013","05/11/2013"

Here is an example of how I need the file to look like:

"Permit Number/Id","Permit Name","Description","Start Date","End Date"
"COO123","Music Festival",,"02/12/2013","02/12/2013"
"COO456","Race Weekend",,"02/23/2013","02/23/2013"
"COO789","Basketball Final 8 Championships - Media vs. Politicians Skills Competition",,"02/22/2013","02/22/2013"
"COO012","Dragonboat race weekend",,"05/11/2013","05/11/2013"

NOTE: I did simplify the file by removing a few extra columns. The logic should be able to accommodation any number of columns though. The actual full header line is with all columns is. Technically, I expect the "extra" newlines to be found in Description and Location columns.

"Permit Number/Id","Permit Name","Description","Start Date","End Date","Custom Status","Owner Name","Total Expected Attendance","Location"

I have tried sed, cut, tr, nawk, etc. Open to any solution that can do this..that can be called from within a unix script.

Thanks!!!

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so it's basically a CSV file? –  Marc B Feb 12 '13 at 14:29
1  
So what's the algorithm? Substitute newline character while line finishes with...? –  fedorqui Feb 12 '13 at 14:31
    
If you're loading this data into Oracle, there are options you can use to leave embedded CR in place. Good luck. –  shellter Feb 12 '13 at 15:14
    
Yes, it is a CSV file. I tried to get the source to define the end of a line, but their system cannot do that. I am loading it into Oracle via SQL*Loader which is where it fails as the rows don't follow the expected layout. Was attempting to fix the source of the error –  user2065046 Feb 12 '13 at 17:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you must remove newline characters from only within the 'Description' and 'Location' fields, you will need a proper csv parser (think Text::CSV). You could also do this fairly easily using GNU awk, but you won't have access to gawk on Solaris unfortunately. Therefore, the next best solution would be to join lines that don't start with a double-quote to the previous line. You can do this using sed. I've written this with compatibility in mind:

sed -e :a -e '$!N; s/ *\n\([^"]\)/ \1/; ta' -e 'P;D' file

Results:

"Permit Id","Permit Name","Description","Start Date","End Date"
"COO123","Music Festival",,"02/12/2013","02/12/2013"
"COO456","Race Weekend",,"02/23/2013","02/23/2013"
"COO789","Basketball Final 8 Championships - Media vs. Politicians Skills Competition",,"02/22/2013","02/22/2013"
"COO012","Dragonboat race weekend",,"05/11/2013","05/11/2013"
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Awesome! That appears to work perfectly. Really appreciate you help everyone! Thanks Steve for this. –  user2065046 Feb 12 '13 at 17:59
sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/ \n/ /g'

Reads the whole file into the pattern space, then removes all newlines which occur directly after a space - assuming that all the errant newlines fit this pattern. If not, when else should newlines be removed?

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Thanks for the suggestion. However it does not seem to work in Solaris. I have tried different shells with no luck as well. cat test_data.dat | sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/ \n/ /g' produces "ba;s/: Event not found" under csh and "Label too long: :a;N;$!ba;s/ \n/ /g" under other shells. –  user2065046 Feb 12 '13 at 17:51

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