Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have following sample code explaining sample Polymorphism concept - Overriding


    class Super
    {
        public int number = 1;
        public char superText='a';
        public String getColor()
        {
            return "red";
        }
    }

    class Sub extends Super
    {
        public int number = 2;
        public char subText='b';

        public String getColor()
        {
            return "blue";
        }
    }


    public class Sample2 
    {
        public static void main(String[] args)
        {
            Super supersub = new Sub();
            System.out.println( supersub.getColor() + supersub.number + supersub.superText );
        }



    }

The Output is blue1.

Question 1:

The Method in derived class getColor() is overridden and Field of the Super class is displayed.

Can some one explain why number field in derived class is not called ? i.e., output is blue2


Question 2: *REGARDING MEMORY ALLOCATION*

for below object instantiation,

   Sub subobj = new Sub(); 
Memory for field 'number' is allocated in heap and the address of the Number variable is assigned to object reference, subobj.

consider below case,

Super supersub = new Sub(); 

(a) Here memory for variables, 'number and subText' in derived class 'Sub' is created and the address of the variables is placed in supersub Object

when i access, supersub.subText i got error that subText cannot be resolved.

SO, PLEASE EXPLAIN POINT (a) described above i.e., Memory Allocation of Derive Class variables

Thanks, Cyborgz

share|improve this question
2  
you should at least attempt to explain what you think the answers are... –  Mitch Wheat Feb 12 '13 at 14:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question 1:

The Method is derived class is displayed and Field of the Super class is displayed.

Can some one explain why number field in derived class is not called ? i.e., output is blue2

Fields cannot be overridden. Even if two classes share a parent-child relationship, the fields belong to the class they were defined in, even if they share names with an inherited field. In other words, number in Sub is totally different field than number in Super.

Question 2: Here memory for variables, 'number and subText' in derived class 'Sub' is created and the address of the variables is placed in supersub Object when i access, supersub.subText i got error that subText cannot be resolved.

The object stored in supersub is of type Sub, but the compiler doesn't know that.

Because Java is a statically typed language, the compiler goes by the declared type (that is, the variable type) of the reference because, in most real-world cases, the runtime type (the one that's apparent in the new expression) isn't necessarily known at compile time. For example, you may have gotten this object from another method, or from two or three candidate methods, therefore the runtime type is unpredictable.

Storing the reference in a superclass variable means that you intent to use that object as Super for a while. The compiler, then, works on this perceived intention of yours. Super isn't guaranteed to only have instances of a runtime type of Sub, therefore it can't make the assumptions you expect.

That being said, storing the reference in one kind of variable or another does not modify the object. If you were to cast the object back to a variable of a type that actually knows about those members you're trying to access (in your case, the Sub type), you'll find that they're still there (and they retain their values).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the Information regarding the compiler.Its very useful. –  Cyborgz Feb 12 '13 at 14:53

Can some one explain why number field in derived class is not called ?

That's because fields are not polymorphic. When accessing fields on a particular reference, you get access to the field defined in the reference type, and decision is not based on the actual object type.

Memory for field 'number' is allocated in heap and the address of the Number variable is assigned to object reference, subobj.

No, number is primitive type int, and primitives are not allocated on heap. They are stored on literal pool. Primitives, and Wrapper classes are two different things. Had you used Integer instead of int, then you would have created object on Heap, if the value was not in the range, that is cached by Java literal pool.

supersub.subText i got error that subText cannot be resolved.

This can be infered from the explanation of your first doubt. Since field access are resolved based on reference type, and not on actual object type. So, clearly you can't access subText on a Super reference, since that field is not the part of that class, rather of the sub class.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation! –  Cyborgz Feb 12 '13 at 14:51
    
@Cyborgz.. You're welcome :) ROFL. And why you got confused so much for accepting an answer. You can take as much time, and mark only that answer as accepted that makes you understand the concept more clearly. But don't play around like that, accepting and de-accepting answers. It feels bad to everyone. –  Rohit Jain Feb 12 '13 at 14:54
    
@Cyborgz It seems you got a little confused with the accept button. On this site, you can only accept one answer per question (that's the check mark) as the correct. In contrast, you can mark multiple answers as helpful (that's the up arrow), in case that's what you were trying to do. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Feb 12 '13 at 14:57
    
Rohit & Theodoros,Sorry. Beginner here. I think, multiple answer can be choosen. Thanks again for tips! –  Cyborgz Feb 12 '13 at 15:01
    
@Cyborgz.. It's absolutely no problem. Just was informing you. –  Rohit Jain Feb 12 '13 at 15:08

Fields in Java are not called and are never subject to dynamic dispatch/runtime polymorphism. In your case there are actually two separate fields that just happen to have the same name: Super#number and Sub#number. The Sub class inherits Super#number so it has both, and which one you access depends on the static compile-time type of the variable you access it through. That explains why subobj accesses one and superobj the other.

share|improve this answer

Simply, because you cannot override fields. The methods are the only things that can be overridden.

share|improve this answer

You do not override class variables in Java: you hide them. Overriding is for instance methods.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.