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I am trying to write a game using the new Minecraft Pi Edition API for Python 2.7. I had the game almost finished, when I realised that there where two sections of the code blocking each other. If I put section A first, it would prevent section B from running, until section A was finished. If I put section B first, it would run really slowly. I decided that I needed to split the two sections into two separate threads. '

This is a cut down version of the code that still exhibits the problem. I noticed that if I commented out the ClassName.start() line for one of the two classes, the other class would run without error.

import mcpi.minecraft as minecraft
import threading

mc = minecraft.Minecraft.create()

class BlockCheckThread(threading.Thread):
    def run(self):
        while True:
            event = mc.events.pollBlockHits()

class WinningCheckThread(threading.Thread):
    def run(self):
        while True:
            blockTest = mc.getBlock(1, 1, 1,) == 50

def main():
    WinningCheckThread().start() # If I comment out either of these .start() lines
    BlockCheckThread().start()   # the other class executes perfectly.

The errors from running this were as follows:

Exception in thread Thread-2:
...
TypeError: Hit() takes exactly 5 arguments (1 given)

Exception in thread Thread-1:
...
ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '

To run the code you will need a Raspberry Pi, and will need to download Minecraft from here You then have to run it from the api/python/ directory. (i.e. It has to be in the same folder as the mcpi module it's importing.)

This is my first attempt at threading, so don't laugh too hard at my code. I am interested to know why this code doesn't work, and what I should do to fix it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are sharing the Minecraft object and it's not thread safe. The Minecraft object is simply a client library to connect to the Minecraft server started with the command minecraft-pi. You need to create a Minecraft object for every thread and it should be fine:

import mcpi.minecraft as minecraft
import threading

class BlockCheckThread(threading.Thread):
    def run(self):
        mc = minecraft.Minecraft.create()
        while True:
            event = mc.events.pollBlockHits()

class WinningCheckThread(threading.Thread):
    def run(self):
        mc = minecraft.Minecraft.create()
        while True:
            blockTest = mc.getBlock(1, 1, 1,) == 50

def main():
    WinningCheckThread().start() 
    BlockCheckThread().start()   
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Thanks. That worked! Everything's working perfectly now! Yay! Too many exclamation marks! –  daviewales Feb 13 '13 at 0:43
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The Python Minecraft client of the Pi Edition is not thread-safe. What happens is that the two threads both send and receive data at the same time. When the response get mixed up (i.e. the BlockCheckThread gets the response to the request of WinningCheckThread and vice versa), the message formats do not match what the threads expect to get.

You can simply put a lock around each invocation of the Minecraft client to make sure you send and receive only one item at a time.

I don't know if the Minecraft server supports it, but you may also be able to send multiple requests. For that, you'll need a manager class that keeps track of the order of the outstanding requests though.

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