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I don't know why, but I'm getting two different result if I'm changing the parameter from a decimal to a fraction.

These methods would return the exact value. I'm trying to round up a number if it's a decimal, for example:

0.0 -> 0

0.1 -> 1

0.4 -> 1

0.5 -> 1

0.6 -> 1

1.0 -> 1

1.1 -> 2

// accepts Double
private void myRound(Double d){
   int res = (int)Math.ceil(d);
   return (res <= 0 ? 1 : res);
}

// acepts int
private void myRound(int i){
   int res = (int)Math.ceil(i);
   return (res <= 0 ? 1 : res);
}

Example:

System.out.println(myRound(14 / 10));

OUTPUT: 1

System.out.println(myRound(1.4);

OUTPUT: 2

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1  
You example output doesn't match your example code (not least because you're never calling myRound). –  T.J. Crowder Feb 12 '13 at 15:07
    
You could replace the version for ints with Math.max(i, 1) as the ceiling for an int is the int itself. –  Mark Rotteveel Feb 12 '13 at 15:10
    
I suppose your code is actually something like is: System.out.println( myRound(1.4) ); isn't it? –  Miguel Prz Feb 12 '13 at 15:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The thing is that firstly the conversion goes to Integer, where (14/10) is 1, and then it ceils it to 1. 1.4 is a double, so it makes it ceil as a double number.

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3  
To be more specific: 14/10 is exactly 1. Not 1.0, but 1. Converting either the 14 or the 10 to a float or a double (by adding a d or f after them, or .0 for a double) makes the result of the division 1.4 as one might expect (or at least close enough). –  Michael Myers Feb 12 '13 at 15:08
    
Not just could, it is the cause. –  Mark Rotteveel Feb 12 '13 at 15:08
    
@MichaelMyers, yeah, my bad. It is 1. –  Constantine Novykov Feb 12 '13 at 15:08
2  
This is correct. Because both 14 and 10 are int, the results of division will be an int. I bet if you did 14.0 and 10.0 it would work. –  David K Feb 12 '13 at 15:09

14/10, as you've written it, is 1, because both 14 and 10 will be int and so the result is an int.

What you've listed as your output doesn't match your code (not least because the code you've shown never calls myRound), but I suspect that would be the explanation for whatever you're actually seeing.

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