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I just encountered a behavior I first thought it was a bug in Eclipse. Consider this simple class:

public class Foo {
    public static interface Callback {
        public void onAction();
    }
}

This is perfectly valid. However, this isn't:

public class Foo implements Callback {
    public static interface Callback {
        public void onAction();
    }

    public void onAction() { /*some implementation*/ }
}

But this is valid, too:

public class Foo {
    public static interface Callback {
        public void onAction();
    }

    private final Callback mCallback = new Callback() {
        public void onAction() { /*some implementation*/ }
    };
}

Why does Java force me to kind of 'waste' a member for it, if it could simply save it by letting me implement this itself? I'm well aware of the 'workaround' to put this interface in its own file, but out of curiosity: Is there a reason why this won't work?

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AFAIK, you cannot do a new on an interface, so new Callback() is invalid –  Miguel Prz Feb 12 '13 at 15:22
2  
I'm not sure of the official rationale for this not working, but I don't see any reason why you would want to have a class implement an interface which it contains -- why wouldn't you just define the class with the methods you're trying to put into the interface? Why do you want an interface at all in this case? –  iamnotmaynard Feb 12 '13 at 15:22
2  
@MiguelPrz he's creating an implementation of the interface inline using {} –  Miquel Feb 12 '13 at 15:23
    
@MiguelPrz Actually, that's instantiating an anonymous class which implements Callback. It is valid, and can be useful. –  iamnotmaynard Feb 12 '13 at 15:23
1  
This post has some good explanation on inner interfaces and their semantics. –  sbk Feb 12 '13 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In your 2nd case, since the signatures are checked before the bodies of the classes, when the compiler tries to compile the Foo class, the Callback interface isn't defined yet.

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Using this code

public class Foo implements Callback{

public static interface Callback{
    public void onAction()
}

public void onAction(){//some implementation}
}

what is Callback ? The compiler (btw which is different from Eclipse, ) doesn't know what is Callback.

You defined the Callback interface after you used it.

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can't the compiler look ahead and get a list of all classes to come ?! feels kinda silly –  NikkyD Jun 24 at 17:11

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