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I've got a simple method that should get the current date, put it into a certain format and then return it as a String. Up to this point it's been fine (last tried it on about 31st Jan) but for some reason when I tried it today it returns the String "2013-02-43".

Now obviously there aren't 43 days in February and I have no idea why it's returning this. I've searched everywhere I can for a solution but none of them seem to fit the specific problem I am having. Here is the code:

public String getDate(){
    DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("YYYY-MM-DD");
    Date date = new Date();

    return dateFormat.format(date);
}

Just for the record I've tried using Calendar.getInstance() etc. with the same result. Interestingly when I try

get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) 

it comes back with 12, so somewhere the numbers are right but something's going wrong in between.

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
"d" Not "D" specifies "Day in month", "M" not "m" specifies "Month in year". I feel a little bit ashamed to get reputation from this kind of questions. – Hui Zheng Feb 12 '13 at 15:40
3  
For the record, when two different APIs aren't producing the results you suspect it's unlikely that the problem resides in the APIs. – Brian Roach Feb 12 '13 at 15:42
up vote 12 down vote accepted

DD means Day of Year, not Day of Month. You want yyyy-MM-dd.

public String getDate(){
    DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
    Date date = new Date();

    return dateFormat.format(date);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow, that was dumb of me, my bad. Thanks so much! – forcey123 Feb 12 '13 at 15:36
4  
Shouldn't YYYY be also replaced with yyyy? – Rohit Jain Feb 12 '13 at 15:38
    
Yep. You got it :) – Chris Cashwell Feb 12 '13 at 15:49

Capital D in a DateFormat is date in year. You want date in month:

DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
share|improve this answer

Try this: "yyyy-MM-dd"

Case sensitivity matters. "DD" is the day in the year.

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Read the javadoc of SimpleDateFormat. Y doesn't exist, and D is the day in year. You want yyyy-MM-dd as your pattern.

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1  
Y was added in Java 7 as place holder for "week-year". – jarnbjo Feb 12 '13 at 16:05

You may want to use format "yyyy-MM-dd" with lower case d. Capital D is the format for day in year. You can find an overview of date patterns here.

share|improve this answer

Your format string should be "YYYY-MM-dd" rather than "YYYY-MM-DD".

DD is "Day in year", while dd is "Day in month".

Check out the reference.

share|improve this answer
    
And the "yyyy" should be lowercase. – Basil Bourque Feb 11 '14 at 11:38

Looks like the dateformat should be in lower case

DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");

That returns 2013-02-12

Else it returns the day of the year.

Please refer to SimpleDateFormat API page for the entire list of accepted format patterns.

share|improve this answer

Use following code:

SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("YYYY-MM-dd");
Date date = new Date();
System.out.println(df.format(date));

It should be dd and not DD.

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