Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I want to define within a class a variable that can be read by any other function but that can be modified only by member function. For example, C# has the Property for this purpose. Traditionally, we've defined a function that returns a private member variable. But i think that does not look sophisticated.

Is there any other way to do this in C++?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Alok Save, Andy Prowl, netcoder, Carl, Alastair Pitts Feb 13 '13 at 4:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
All the C# property is is a pretty wrapping on the same thing your are talking about with C++. Just make a private (or protected) member variable, provide a public getting and a private/protected setter, and you effectively have exactly what c# is doing. Sophisticated or not. –  David Hope Feb 12 '13 at 15:47
    
@DavidHope or no setter at all. –  Arne Mertz Feb 12 '13 at 15:50
    
This is not a duplicate of the question stated above, since that is about inheritance and this one about C#-style readonly access. –  Arne Mertz Feb 14 '13 at 7:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted
class A
{
private:
    string m_string;

public:
    const string& GetString() const
    {
        return m_string;
    }

    __declspec(property(get=GetString)) string String;
};

A a;
cout << a.String << endl;

Still not as good as in C#, though.

And of course there's C++/CLI properties (for managed classes), which are closer to C# properties:

ref class A
{
private:
    String^ m_theString;

public:
    property String^ TheString
    {
        String^ get()
        {
            return m_theString;
        }
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! This is what i wanted!! Thank you! –  isbae93 Feb 13 '13 at 18:45
    
@ArneMertz Nope, it's not C++/CLI. I updated the answer to show C++/CLI properties. –  user1610015 Feb 14 '13 at 7:58
    
This is a Microsoft extension, not standard C++. So it will compile only on MSVC. –  Arne Mertz Feb 14 '13 at 8:00
    
@user1610015 yes, noted that it's not CLI - but it's still MS-only –  Arne Mertz Feb 14 '13 at 8:02

No. Getter functions (and if necessary Setters as well) are the C++ way to access data members. In general, you make any data member a private variable to ensure encapsulation. You use public data members only if what you are designing is not a real class but a mere "bunch of data" without (much) behavior on its own, in which case it is common to define it as a struct.

share|improve this answer

Your qualms about returning access to a private member are unwarranted.

class Thing
{
public:
    const std::string& GetString() const { return m_String; } // users can access m_String by calling GetString()

    void SomeRandomFunc() { m_String = "Hello"; } // member functions can write to m_String

private:
    std::string m_String;
};
share|improve this answer

If you write in Visual Studio than there is Property in C++ like C#. But compiler-specific of course. If you ask me, I prefer "get" function

share|improve this answer
    
What... really?! Can you link to docs –  Dave Feb 12 '13 at 15:51
    
There are properties for C++/CLI...link here: codeproject.com/Articles/10352/… –  David Hope Feb 12 '13 at 15:55

there is no such thing as property in C++, even in C# this is a pair of set/get functions. Just some sugar.

But you could do something that will look pretty much the same as property.

Just take a look at this class prototype

    template<class T, class Owner>
class Property {
    friend Owner;
public:
    Property(const T &_v) : m_v(_v) {
    }

    operator T() {
        return m_v;
    }

private:
    T   m_v;

    Property<T,Owner>& operator = (const Property<T,Owner> &v) {
        m_v = v.m_v;
        return *this;
    }

    Property<T,Owner>& operator = (const T& v) {
        m_v = v;
        return *this;
    }
};

And declare in your class public member like

class Test {
public:
    Test() : Data(0) {}

    Property<int, Test> Data;

    void SetData(int data) {
        Data = data;


    }
    };
share|improve this answer
    
operator T() is non-const, so you cannot read the underlying int of Test::Data of a const Test object. operator T() is returning m_v by value, this might cause a performance degradation. Also the template Property does not obey the rule of five. –  Werner Henze Feb 12 '13 at 16:07
    
you could add operator T() const. Returning object by value also could be managed. Please don't treat this as a production code, this is just example of an idea. –  Ation Feb 12 '13 at 16:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.