Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to make some shuffles of sets which will be the same every time my program is run:

This is one way to do it:

(def colours ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "magenta" "black" "white"])

(defn colour-shuffle [n] 
  (let [cs (nth (clojure.math.combinatorics/permutations colours) n)]
    [(first cs) (drop 1 cs)]))

; use (rand-int 40320) to make up numbers, then hard code:
(def colour-shuffle-39038 (colour-shuffle 39038))
(def colour-shuffle-28193 (colour-shuffle 28193))
(def colour-shuffle-5667  (colour-shuffle 5667))
(def colour-shuffle-8194  (colour-shuffle 8194))
(def colour-shuffle-13895 (colour-shuffle 13895))
(def colour-shuffle-2345  (colour-shuffle 2345))

colour-shuffle-39038 ; ["white" ("magenta" "blue" "green" "cyan" "yellow" "red" "black")]

But it takes a while to evaluate, and seems wasteful and rather inelegant.

Is there some way of generating shuffle 39038 directly, without generating and consuming all of the sequence?

(I already realise that I can hard code them, or bring the effort back to compile time with a macro. That also seems a bit rubbish.)

share|improve this question
4  
You could use a standard shuffle algorithm like Fisher–Yates but add a seed argument for the RNG –  Mike Weller Feb 12 '13 at 16:11
    
Mike, yes, that's what I was thinking. Is there one already in clojure or one of its libs or do I have to code one up? –  John Lawrence Aspden Feb 12 '13 at 17:40
1  
Sounds like you are asking if you can number permutations and choose the nth one without generating the n-1 before it. Yes, you do this by implementing a decoding of Lehmer codes. I've taken a stab at this in my answer. –  A. Webb Feb 12 '13 at 20:07
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sounds like you want to number permutations:

(def factorial (reductions * 1 (drop 1 (range))))

(defn factoradic [n] {:pre [(>= n 0)]}
   (loop [a (list 0) n n p 2]
      (if (zero? n) a (recur (conj a (mod n p)) (quot n p) (inc p)))))

(defn nth-permutation [s n] {:pre [(< n (nth factorial (count s)))]}
  (let [d (factoradic n)
        choices (concat (repeat (- (count s) (count d)) 0) d)]
    ((reduce 
        (fn [m i] 
          (let [[left [item & right]] (split-at i (m :rem))]
            (assoc m :rem (concat left right) 
                     :acc (conj (m :acc) item))))
      {:rem s :acc []} choices) :acc)))

Let's try it:

(def colours ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "magenta" "black" "white"])

(nth-permutation colours 39038)
=> ["white" "magenta" "blue" "green" "cyan" "yellow" "red" "black"]

...as in the question, but without generating any of the other permutations.

Well enough, but would we get them all?

(def x (map (partial nth-permutation colours) (range (nth factorial (count colours)))))

(count x)
=> 40320
(count (distinct x))
=> 40320
(nth factorial (count colours))
=> 40320

Note the permutations are generated in (lexicographic by index) order:

user=> (pprint (take 24 x))
(["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "magenta" "black" "white"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "magenta" "white" "black"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "black" "magenta" "white"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "black" "white" "magenta"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "white" "magenta" "black"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "white" "black" "magenta"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "magenta" "cyan" "black" "white"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "magenta" "cyan" "white" "black"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "magenta" "black" "cyan" "white"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "magenta" "black" "white" "cyan"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "magenta" "white" "cyan" "black"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "magenta" "white" "black" "cyan"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "black" "cyan" "magenta" "white"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "black" "cyan" "white" "magenta"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "black" "magenta" "cyan" "white"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "black" "magenta" "white" "cyan"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "black" "white" "cyan" "magenta"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "black" "white" "magenta" "cyan"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "white" "cyan" "magenta" "black"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "white" "cyan" "black" "magenta"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "white" "magenta" "cyan" "black"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "white" "magenta" "black" "cyan"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "white" "black" "cyan" "magenta"]
 ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "white" "black" "magenta" "cyan"])
share|improve this answer
    
Dude, that is the sweetest thing ever. If you change the 1 in factorial to 1N then you can do (nth-permutation (range 30) 100000000000000000000000) ;-> [0 1 2 3 4 5 9 26 29 13 10 18 28 16 15 8 27 20 25 23 19 14 21 22 24 7 12 17 6 11] in very little time indeed. Exactly what I wanted and beautifully done. Thank you so much. Do you mind if I blog about it? (learningclojure.com) –  John Lawrence Aspden Feb 13 '13 at 19:59
    
@JohnLawrenceAspden Feel free to use in any way you like! –  A. Webb Feb 13 '13 at 20:24
add comment

My recommendation: use a closure and calculate the permutations only once. Then re-use those permutations to select an element from it. In your function colour-shuffle, the permutations are re-calculated for every call which isn't very efficient.

(use 'clojure.math.combinatorics)

(def colours ["red" "blue" "green" "yellow" "cyan" "magenta" "black" "white"])

(def select-permutation
  (let [perms (permutations colours)]
    (fn [n]
      (nth perms n))))

(defn colour-shuffle [n] 
  (let [cs (nth (permutations colours) n)]
    [(first cs) (drop 1 cs)]))

(time (do  (def colour-shuffle-39038 (colour-shuffle 39038))
           (def colour-shuffle-28193 (colour-shuffle 28193))
           (def colour-shuffle-5667  (colour-shuffle 5667))
           (def colour-shuffle-8194  (colour-shuffle 8194))
           (def colour-shuffle-13895 (colour-shuffle 13895))
           (def colour-shuffle-2345  (colour-shuffle 2345))))

(time (do (def select-permutation-39038 (select-permutation 39038))
          (def select-permutation-28193 (select-permutation 28193))
          (def select-permutation-5667  (select-permutation 5667))
          (def select-permutation-8194  (select-permutation 8194))
          (def select-permutation-13895 (select-permutation 13895))
          (def select-permutation-2345  (select-permutation 2345))))

(time (do  (def colour-shuffle-39038 (colour-shuffle 39038))
           (def colour-shuffle-28193 (colour-shuffle 28193))
           (def colour-shuffle-5667  (colour-shuffle 5667))
           (def colour-shuffle-8194  (colour-shuffle 8194))
           (def colour-shuffle-13895 (colour-shuffle 13895))
           (def colour-shuffle-2345  (colour-shuffle 2345))))

(time (do (def select-permutation-39038 (select-permutation 39038))
          (def select-permutation-28193 (select-permutation 28193))
          (def select-permutation-5667  (select-permutation 5667))
          (def select-permutation-8194  (select-permutation 8194))
          (def select-permutation-13895 (select-permutation 13895))
          (def select-permutation-2345  (select-permutation 2345))))

Output:

"Elapsed time: 129.023 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 65.472 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 182.226 msecs"
"Elapsed time: 5.715 msecs"

Note that the second run of time using select-permutation is even faster. This is because results of lazy sequences are cached after calculation. Requesting an element very deep into the lazy-seq will cause all preceding elements to be calculated as well. This is why the first run takes much longer. When requesting the 39039th element from a fresh lazy-seq will cause at least 39040 elements to be calculated (in chucks of 32).

Btw, If your random numbers are going to be hardcoded anyway, you might as well hardcode the above retrieved permutations.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget about ...every time my program is run... part. –  mobyte Feb 12 '13 at 16:52
    
If you pick the same "random" elements (permutations) every time the program is run, you might as well just hard-code those elements. See the last line in my answer. –  Michiel Borkent Feb 12 '13 at 17:00
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.