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Simple question: does handedness change the values of near and far for an orthogonol view? For instance: left-handed looking down z is positive (going farther away) and right-handed looking down z is negative values.

Does this mean that for left-handed near/far should be -1,1 and for right-handed near/far should be 1,-1? or is it always just -1,1?

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If you create your projection matrix with e.g. glOrtho(), you provide the values of the nearer and farther depth clipping plane. If you have a look at the actual matrix, you will see that the resulting z-coordinate after projection is

z_proj = (-2 * z_view - far - near) / (far - near)

If far > near, then this value increases as z_view decreases. That means objects with a smaller z_view are farther away than objects with a greater z_view. This equals the right-handed coordinate system where objects in front of the camera have negative z-values.

If far < near, then this value increases as z_view increases. That means objects with a greater z_view are farther away than objects with a smaller z_view. This equals the left-handed coordinate system where objects in front of the camera have positive z-values.

You may further notice that a z_view of -near maps to -1 and a z_view of -far maps to +1. So for a right-handed coordinate system the room in front of the camera is specified by positive values and the room behind the camera is specified by negative values. For a left-handed coordinate system it is vice versa.

The actual (absolute) values depend on your scene. Usually, you don't want to show anything behind the camera. So you can set near to 0 (or the distance to the first object in the scene). You should set far at least to the distance of the farthest pixel to the camera. If you want to use a left-handed coordinate system, invert these values. E.g. [0, 2] for right-handed becomes [0, -2] for left-handed.

If you don't want to always think about this, you can extract the handedness part of the projection matrix into a separate scale matrix:

ProjectionRH = Ortho * Scal(0, 0, 1)
ProjectionLH = Ortho * Scal(0, 0, -1)
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