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I made a simple program in pthreads that passed multiple parameters to the called function via a struct. Consider these two programs:
Program 1 :

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <malloc.h>

struct args{
    long long val1;
    int val2;
};

void *hello(void* threadid){
    struct args *tid;
    tid=(struct args*)threadid;
    printf("thread %lld\n",tid->val1);
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(){
    pthread_t threads[20];
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<20;i++){
        // ***** specific memory given to the struct *****
        struct args* a1=(struct args*)malloc(sizeof(struct args));    
        a1->val1=i;
        a1->val2=i+1;
        int ret=pthread_create(&threads[i],NULL,hello,(void*)a1);
        if(ret){
            printf("error code %d for %d\n",ret,i);
        }
    }
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

which prints output as expected, some permutation of 0..19

On the other hand, consider Program p2

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct args{
    long long val1;
    int val2;
};

void *hello(void* threadid){
    struct args *tid;
    tid=(struct args*)threadid;
    printf("thread %lld\n",tid->val1);
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(){
    pthread_t threads[20];
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<20;i++){
        // ***** struct made like normal declarations *****
        struct args a1;
        a1.val1=i;
        a1.val2=i+1;
        int ret=pthread_create(&threads[i],NULL,hello,(void*)&a1);
        if(ret){
            printf("error code %d for %d\n",ret,i);
        }
    }
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

This program has repeating and incomplete entries, like

thread 3
thread 5
thread 3
thread 4
thread 3
thread 6
thread 7
thread 8
thread 9
thread 10
thread 11
thread 12
thread 13
thread 15
thread 15
thread 16
thread 17
thread 18
thread 19
thread 19

Why is instantiation of struct directly causing overlap of this kind? Shouldn't C provide a new memory block for each time in the loop?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your second example, a1 is declared with automatic-storage duration in a for loop. This means that at the end of every iteration, that storage location may then be re-used for the next iteration. Therefore:

int ret=pthread_create(&threads[i],NULL,hello,(void*)&a1);

...you may be passing an address (&a1) to a memory location that will be modified in the subsequent iteration. malloc on the other hand, will allocate a pointer to a different memory location at every iteration.

Since there's no guarantee whether or not the thread will execute before or after the next iteration begins, you may actually get different results each time you run the above code.

Furthermore, using malloc without storing the pointers anywhere or free them in the thread will result in memory being leaked. Your struct may also go out of scope before all your threads finish, the result being them accessing a dangling pointer. Lastly, since you're not joining any of your threads, there's no telling how many will actually execute completely before the program exits.

Welcome to the fantastic world of multi-threading.

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Your second example will get a new instance of a1 for each iteration of the loop but this will very likely point to the same memory used by all previous iterations.

There are no guarantees when or for how long threads will be scheduled so you can't tell whether (and how often) a1 will have been updated when hello runs. This means that the values printed out will be in the range [0, 20) but will be otherwise unpredictable.

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2  
In summary: The code has an undefined behavior. The locally allocated variable being passed to the new thread may/may not be alive by the time the thread actually accesses it. The ordering is not guaranteed. It is guaranteed to be alive only within the scope {} in which it is declared but the new thread still points to the address which may/may not contain a valid value.It is important to mention the UB IMHO. –  Alok Save Feb 12 '13 at 16:17

C may not provide a new memory block for the variable declared inside a loop. The same memory may be used. The reason why are you are seeing overlapped output is because the same memory region should be mostly passed to all the threads and it is also simultaneously getting updated in the main thread. Though you declare a new variable, it is not necessary, that the new variable should get a new memory block. The memory blocks may be reused. This cannot be predicted.

Also, such coding is dangerous because, once the loop is over, the variable will go out of scope which can as well lead to undefined behavior when one of the threads try to access it.

To find out if the same memory is being allocated or not, why don't you try printing the address of a1 which you pass to the thread in each thread. This will provide the best clarity.

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