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I am posting this to answer my own question (to spread the word in case anyone else has had this issue.)

I am generating a QR code using ZXing's Android library. The QR code generates properly and I am able to display it (after rendering it out manually using QRCode.getMatrix().getArray().) However, the QR code generated does not scan with most of the QR code readers available on the Android market, including ZXing's scanner itself!

Additionally, whenever I set the error correction level for Encoder, it ignores it and encodes with some random level (usually level Q).

I generate the QR code with this piece of code:


    QRCode code;

    try
    {
            code = Encoder.encode("...QRCODEDATA...", ErrorCorrectionLevel.L);
    }
    catch(WriterException ex)
    {
            log("Failed to obtain a QR code");
            return null;
    }
    

...and then, after obtaining the QRCode object, I draw the bitmap like so:

byte[][] bitArray = qrCode.getMatrix().getArray();

        if(bitArray == null || bitArray.length < 1)
            return null;

        for(int x = 0;x < bitArray.length;x++)
        {
            for(int y = 0;y < bitArray[x].length;y++)
            {
                if(bitArray[x][y] == 0)
                    bitmapDrawCell(x,y,WHITE);
                else
                    bitmapDrawCell(x,y,BLACK);
            }
        }

Here's what I end up with.


It looks right, but it won't scan. A handful of QR code scanner will still scan it, but most will not. What's going on?

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3  
The answer to this issue: The QR code is actually flipped. Although the ZXing documentation does not explain how to index into the array that qrCode.getMatrix().getArray() returns, it assumes that you will index it as [y][x], and then draw that cell at (x,y). The code posted in the question indexes the array as [x][y], which flips the image along the Y=X line. The resulting QR code seems legitimate, but only 'smart' scanners can detect this sort of flipping and scan it. (The error correction level bits are also on the opposite corner.) –  Alex Feb 12 '13 at 16:48
    
yes, I tried it with my scanner. While the original gives unrecoverable errors, the flipped version can be read without errors. You should make this an answer and accept it so that the question is no longer open. –  Henry Feb 12 '13 at 17:01
    
@Henry: I will make this an official answer as soon as I have enough reputation (stackoverflow is very restrictive for new users). –  Alex Feb 12 '13 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The answer to this issue:

The QR code is actually flipped. Although the ZXing documentation does not explain how to index into the array that qrCode.getMatrix().getArray() returns, it assumes that you will index it as [y][x], and then draw that cell at (x,y). The code posted in the question indexes the array as [x][y], which flips the image along the Y=X line.

The resulting QR code seems legitimate, but only 'smart' scanners can detect this sort of flipping and scan it.

The error correction level bits are also on the opposite corner, so if you were to verify by hand (looking at a few bits in the lower right corner of the image), it would appear that the library is ignoring the error correction settings.

flipped QR code

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1  
Yes, though I suppose you are intended to use the getter methods rather than accessing the array directly, because the getter is clear about x vs y. This is an old hold-over class from C++ and the representation is row-major which is actually intuitive when thinking about the barcode in rows but 'flipped' when it comes to indexing into it. I'll doc it though the method probably should be just deprecated. –  Sean Owen Feb 12 '13 at 20:06
    
Thanks for your response Sean. I'd rather it just be documented for now. I like the idea of having the entire thing represented as an array for efficiency's sake. In my case it doesn't matter, but with a large QR code maybe it would be faster to use the array? I'm not a Java profiling expert so I may be wrong here. –  Alex Feb 12 '13 at 21:05
    
The JIT will inline such a simple getter at runtime quickly. Even without it, a method call is very small and even a large 200x200 code accessed thousands of times at every position is only millions of method calls... talking about milliseconds. –  Sean Owen Feb 12 '13 at 22:07

Not necessarily the answer to your question, but you can consider Google's QR generator. I used it and it pretty simple. Google QR

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I considered this as an option, but the issue was, that Google's online QR code generator requires a network call, and the app I was writing specifically could not use internet at the exact time the QR code was being generated (think of this as being your ticket for boarding a subway, where internet connectivity would be poor.) Good find though! –  Alex Feb 12 '13 at 16:45

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