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I am working on a project, but I cannot use any existing java data structures (ie, ArraysList, trees, etc)

I can only use arrays. Therefore, I need to dynamically update an array with new memory.

I am reading from a text file, and I pre-allocate 100 for the arrays memory:

   String [] wordList;
   int wordCount = 0;
   int occurrence = 1;
   int arraySize = 100;
   wordList = new String[arraySize];
   while ((strLine = br.readLine()) != null)   {
         // Store the content into an array
         Scanner s = new Scanner(strLine);
         while(s.hasNext()) {
           wordList[wordCount] = s.next();
           wordCount++;
         } 
   }

Now this works fine for under 100 list items. br.readline is the buffered reader going through each line of a textfile. I have it then store each word into list and then increment my index (wordCount).

However, once I have a text file with more than 100 items, I get an allocation error.

How can I dynamically update this array (and thereby sort of reinvent the wheel)?

Thanks!

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I think the fastest solution would be to count the lines in the input file (wc -l filename in 'nix) and allocate the array to the right size first time. All this copying is much slower than rewinding the file and reading it twice... –  Floris Feb 12 '13 at 16:36
1  
possible duplicate of java dynamic array sizes? –  Brian Roach Feb 12 '13 at 16:38
    
Also, see: stackoverflow.com/q/8438879/422353 –  madth3 Feb 12 '13 at 16:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do something like this:

String [] wordList;
int wordCount = 0;
int occurrence = 1;
int arraySize = 100;
int arrayGrowth = 50;
wordList = new String[arraySize];
while ((strLine = br.readLine()) != null)   {
     // Store the content into an array
     Scanner s = new Scanner(strLine);
     while(s.hasNext()) {
         if (wordList.length == wordCount) {
              // expand list
              wordList = Arrays.copyOf(wordList, wordList.length + arrayGrowth);
         }
         wordList[wordCount] = s.next();
         wordCount++;
     } 
}

Using java.util.Arrays.copyOf(String[]) is basically doing the same thing as:

if (wordList.length == wordCount) {
    String[] temp = new String[wordList.length + arrayGrowth];
    System.arraycopy(wordList, 0, temp, 0, wordList.length);
    wordList = temp;
}

except it is one line of code instead of three. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this was perfect. :) –  Zack Tanner Feb 15 '13 at 16:27

You allocate a new Array (double the capacity, for instance), and move all elements to it.

Basically you need to check if the wordCount is about to hit the wordList.size(), when it does, create a new array with twice the length of the previous one, and copy all elements to it (create an auxiliary method to do this), and assign wordList to your new array.

To copy the contents over, you could use System.arraycopy, but I'm not sure that's allowed with your restrictions, so you can simply copy the elements one by one:

public String[] createNewArray(String[] oldArray){
    String[] newArray = new String[oldArray.length * 2];
    for(int i = 0; i < oldArray.length; i++) {
        newArray[i] = oldArray[i];
    }

    return newArray;
}

Proceed.

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1  
Or you could just use array = Arrays.copyOf(array, newLength). –  Ted Hopp Feb 12 '13 at 16:38
    
Yes, I know that. Like I said, that suggestion is stated in case he cannot use the builtin methods... the same way he cannot use an ArrayList, etc. –  pcalcao Feb 12 '13 at 16:54

You have to manually create a new bigger array and copy over the items.

this may help

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you can not increase array size dynamically better you copy into new array. Use System.arrayCopy for that, it better than copying each element into new array. For reference Why is System.arraycopy native in Java?.

private static Object resizeArray (Object oldArray, int newSize) {
   int oldSize = java.lang.reflect.Array.getLength(oldArray);
   Class elementType = oldArray.getClass().getComponentType();
   Object newArray = java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(
         elementType, newSize);
   int preserveLength = Math.min(oldSize, newSize);
   if (preserveLength > 0)
      System.arraycopy(oldArray, 0, newArray, 0, preserveLength);
   return newArray;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Or you could just use array = Arrays.copyOf(array, newLength). –  Ted Hopp Feb 12 '13 at 16:40
    
basically same :) –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Feb 12 '13 at 16:43
    
Sure ... if you consider a bad re-implementation of a standard library method "the same". –  Brian Roach Feb 12 '13 at 16:48
    
@BrianRoach I hope you checked the library implementation, what do you mean bad implementation? could you please be specific. –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Feb 12 '13 at 16:58
    
Exactly that. You re-invented the wheel (unnecessary) and made it so explicit casts are required. –  Brian Roach Feb 12 '13 at 17:02

Visual Basic has a nice function : ReDim Preserve.

Someone has kindly written an equivalent function - you can find it here. I think it does exactly what you are asking for (and you're not re-inventing the wheel - you're copying someone else's)...

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Take a look at implementation of Java ArrayList. Java ArrayList internally uses a fixed size array and reallocates the array once number of elements exceed current size. You can also implement on similar lines.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for digging into the ArrayList code –  Massimiliano Peluso Feb 12 '13 at 16:36
1  
Or just use array = Arrays.copyOf(array, newLength). –  Ted Hopp Feb 12 '13 at 16:43

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