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I wrote a sample program at http://codepad.org/ko8vVCDF that uses a template function.

How do I retrict the template function to only use numbers? (int, double etc.)

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

    template <typename T>
T sum(vector<T>& a)
{
    T result = 0;
    int size = a.size();
    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        result += a[i];
    }

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    vector<int> int_values;
    int_values.push_back(2);
    int_values.push_back(3);
    cout << "Integer: " << sum(int_values) << endl;

    vector<double> double_values;
    double_values.push_back(1.5);
    double_values.push_back(2.1);
    cout << "Double: " << sum(double_values);

    return 0;
}
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You may have to wait until C++0x compliant compilers are available so you can use concepts. –  Mike Thompson Sep 29 '08 at 11:56
2  
A comma would be helpful in your question. –  Daniel Rodriguez Nov 12 '09 at 17:23
1  
@DanielRodríguez: to be fair, there was a comma in there... –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 16:17
    
What is a "number"? –  curiousguy Dec 3 '11 at 6:35
    
Can you propose code? –  curiousguy Dec 3 '11 at 6:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The only way to restrict a template is to make it so that it uses something from the types that you want, that other types don't have.

So, you construct with an int, use + and +=, call a copy constructor, etc.

Any type that has all of these will work with your function -- so, if I create a new type that has these features, your function will work on it -- which is great, isn't it?

If you want to restrict it more, use more functions that only are defined for the type you want.

Another way to implement this is by creating a traits template -- something like this

template<class T>
SumTraits
{
public:
  const static bool canUseSum = false;
}

And then specialize it for the classes you want to be ok:

template<>
class SumTraits<int>
{
  public:
    const static bool canUseSum = true;
};

Then in your code, you can write

if (!SumTraits<T>::canUseSum) {
   // throw something here
}

edit: as mentioned in the comments, you can use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT to make it a compile-time check instead of a run-time one

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3  
You can also use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT to enforce the condition at compile time. –  ChrisN Sep 29 '08 at 12:24
    
This is a runtime check, which is not a good idea since this can be done at compile time instead. –  Greg Rogers Sep 29 '08 at 13:39
    
SFINAE is the solution to this, not BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT –  Leon Timmermans Sep 29 '08 at 15:20
    
There are ways to do static asserts oneself. (If you mind using boost) E.g. by using a switch(ASDF) {case 0: case SOMETHINGNOZZERO: break;} –  Ronny Brendel Oct 7 '08 at 5:25
    
The only way to restrict and a bit later Another way to ... restrict. Something's not accurate here ... –  phresnel Dec 2 '11 at 16:21
#include <vector>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_arithmetic.hpp>

template<typename T> 
    typename boost::enable_if<typename boost::is_arithmetic<T>::type, T>::type 
        sum(const std::vector<T>& vec)
{
  typedef typename std::vector<T>::size_type size_type;
  T result;
  size_type size = vec.size();
  for(size_type i = 0; i < size; i++)
  {
    result += vec[i];
  }

  return result;
}

ETA: in C++11 that would be:

#include <vector>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename T> 
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_arithmetic<T>::value, T>::type 
        sum(const std::vector<T>& vec)
{
  T result;
  for (auto item : vec)
    result += item;
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the way to go –  sehe Dec 2 '11 at 16:18
    
vector::<T>:: hum... –  curiousguy Dec 3 '11 at 6:36
    
@curiousguy: In this sniplet I assumed the includes (vector) and usings (std) of the OP. –  Leon Timmermans Apr 24 '12 at 18:37
    
@LeonTimmermans So? –  curiousguy Apr 25 '12 at 5:30
    
@curiousguy: D'oh! I see what you meant now! Fixed it. –  Leon Timmermans Apr 25 '12 at 11:12

You can do something like this:

template <class T>
class NumbersOnly
{
private:
    void ValidateType( int    &i ) const {}
    void ValidateType( long   &l ) const {}
    void ValidateType( double &d ) const {}
    void ValidateType( float  &f ) const {}

public:
    NumbersOnly()
    {
       T valid;
       ValidateType( valid );
    };
};

You will get an error if you try to create a NumbersOnly that doesn't have a ValidateType overload:

NumbersOnly<int> justFine;
NumbersOnly<SomeClass> noDeal;
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Good work. lenniedevilliers.codepad.org/aR6xi14c –  Lennie De Villiers Sep 29 '08 at 12:16
3  
I briefly thought this was wrong (sorry), but the & in the method signatures is vital - it prevents instantiation with a type that's only convertible to int. So char, unsigned int, and a class that overloads operator int() are all banned as expected. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 12:53
1  
As is "long double", which might not be what you want. But that's just a question of listing every arithmetic type from the C++ standard. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 12:55
    
@SteveJessop "As is "long double", which might not be what you want." What he wants isn't very clear. –  curiousguy Dec 3 '11 at 6:37
    
@Jeff: This is the solution that I like to use in my codes. Thank you very much! –  Rasoul Jun 22 '13 at 16:45

That is how you do it.

Comment the template specialization for double for example.. and it will not allow you to call that function with double as parameter. The trick is that if you try to call sum with a type that is not among the specializations of IsNumber, then the generic implementation is called, and that implementation makes something not allowed (call a private constructor).

The error message is NOT intuitive unless you rename the IsNumber class to something that sounds like an error message.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<class T> struct IsNumber{ 
 private:
 IsNumber(){}
 };

 template<> struct IsNumber<float>{
   IsNumber(){};
 };

 template<> struct IsNumber<double>{
   IsNumber(){};
 };

 template<> struct IsNumber<int>{
   IsNumber(){};
 };

template <typename T>
T sum(vector<T>& a)
{
 IsNumber<T> test;
 T result = 0;
 int size = a.size();
 for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
 {
  result += a[i];
 }

 return result;
}




int main()
{
 vector<int> int_values;
 int_values.push_back(2);
 int_values.push_back(3);
 cout << "Integer: " << sum(int_values) << endl;

 vector<double> double_values;
 double_values.push_back(1.5);
 double_values.push_back(2.1);
 cout << "Double: " << sum(double_values);

 return 0;
}
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Why would you want to restrict the types in this case? Templates allow "static duck typing", so anything allowed by what your sum function in this case should be allowed. Specifically, the only operation required of T is add-assignment and initialisation by 0, so any type that supports those two operations would work. That's the beauty of templates.

(If you changed your initialiser to T result = T(); or the like, then it would work for both numbers and strings, too.)

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1  
Make it more type safe. –  Lennie De Villiers Sep 29 '08 at 12:12
1  
To expand on "type safe", I'd say "to prevent me having to document and stick to a limited set of assumptions I make about the behaviour of arithmetic operators and conversions, which non-built-in types might not satisfy". Else you might change the implementation in future and want more assumptions. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 12:43
1  
So for example currently it uses +=. If it later changes to use +, then a user whose type only supports += will come a cropper. For an example this simple, I can't think of any other plausible implementation change, and overloading += and not + is asking for trouble anyway, but hopefully yswim. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 13:05
    
onebyone: Hear, hear! Documenting the "interface" is the way to go, works much the same way as with dynamic languages. –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 29 '08 at 13:20

You could look into type traits (use boost, wait for C++0x or create your own).

I found the following on google: http://artins.org/ben/programming/mactechgrp-artin-cpp-type-traits.pdf

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Indeed, there's no need to make it more stringent. Have a look at the string version (using the default constructor style advised by Chris Jester-Young) here...

Take care, too, for overflows - you might need a bigger type to contain intermediate results (or output results). Welcome to the realm of meta-programming, then :)

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