Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In fortran, is it safe to assume that the status of an unallocated array is .not.allocated and that the status of an allocatable array is retained between calls if it is declared with the save attribute? In other words, barring minor output formatting differences, is it safe to assume that the following program will always result in the output:

 First time here
 Been here before

test program:

  program main
    call sub()
    call sub()
  end program main

  subroutine sub()
    real,save,allocatable,dimension(:) :: a
    if(.not. allocated(a))then
       print*,"First time here"
       allocate(a(10))
    else
       print*,"Been here before"
    endif
  end subroutine sub

I ask mainly because I know that you can't assume a pointer's default association is .not.associated

share|improve this question
    
FWIW, without the save the program would be illegal Fortran 90, but legal Fortran 95. –  Vladimir F Feb 12 '13 at 19:23
    
@VladimirF -- Very interesting. What about the program would cause it to be illegal in f90? –  mgilson Feb 13 '13 at 2:37
    
Not sure this is quite correct. As I understand the change between f90 and f95 that is relevant here is that the latter specified that once an allocatable array goes out of scope it is automatically deallocated. Thus in f90 you may get a memory leak ("may" because the standard did not forbid deallocation along f95 lines) while in f95 you definitely will not. Thus my reading is that in f90 the behaviour is implementation defined and bad practice because of the potential memory leak, but not actually illegal, while in f95 all is happiness, sweetness and light. –  Ian Bush Feb 13 '13 at 9:01
    
Depends on your definition of "implementation defined". F90 explicitly specified that a non-saved local allocatable object and its allocation status became undefined at the end of the procedure, and explicitly specified that such an object couldn't be used in any way from that point on. The implementation might stop a leak from happening by doing the F95 automatic deallocation thing, but the program would still be illegal (non-conforming) by F90 rules the second time that sub got called. –  IanH Feb 13 '13 at 9:50
    
Ah. OK, learnt something, thanks. In my mind without save the second invocation creates a new local object independent of the original, but if that's how it didn't work in f90, that's how it didn't work. –  Ian Bush Feb 13 '13 at 11:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes!

And now I discover you need 30 characters...

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for asking a question that only needed a yes/no answer. I've had to pad a few of my answers like this as well :-) –  mgilson Feb 12 '13 at 17:08

Yes, this is one of the nice things with Fortrans allocatable arrays. But, if for some reasons, you had to use pointers, you could achive a similar effect by:

program main
  call sub()
  call sub()
end program main

subroutine sub()
  real, pointer, dimension(:), save :: a => null()
  if(.not. associated(a))then
    print*,"First time here"
    allocate(a(10))
  else
    print*,"Been here before"
  endif
end subroutine sub

The save attribute is optional here, as the assignment in the variable declaration implies this any way.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I was aware of this one ... Although, as per the discussion on the post above, this feature was added in Fortran 95 (I believe). Not Fortran 90. –  mgilson Feb 13 '13 at 13:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.