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I have a network monitor (using Broadcast receiver) in my app, what it does it pops an alertdialog if the phone is not connected to internet and if the phone connects back it pops another alert informing the user he is back online. The problem is every time the monitor sees a state change it creates another window that stacks on top of the other one. For example if the phone has its DATA ON/OFF 3 times it will pop 6 messages. Is there a way of dismissing an alert dialog if another one opens or what would be the best approach to overcome this scenario?

Thank you in advance, your help is very much appreciated. Android newbie

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add a variable containing the currently visible dialog:

            Alertdialog a;

and then when you want to show one:

if (a!=null) {
    a.cancel();
}
a = yourDialogBuilder.show();

Hope this helps.

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This worked perfectly. Thank you ! –  Marquis Feb 12 '13 at 19:37

Dialog has an isShowing() method that should return if the dialog is currently visible. So you can use that to see if a dialog is showing and hide it with dismissDialog().

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I think you should consider re-designing your notification mechanism. Using Dialog can be very disturbing to the user experience since it requires an action to dismiss and interrupt the natural flow of the app.

Consider using Toast for simple notifications or Notification if you want it to show in the statusbar. Also, you can have some icon in your application that reflects the current connectivity status e.g. green is connected and red otherwise.

To ensure only one dialog is available, you can create a static instance of your dialog in your activity and dismiss it if it is not null before showing a new dialog

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1  
I thought about Toasts and Notifications but ended up using Alerts still and indeed the static instance of the alert was the way to go. Somebody else suggested the same thing a little bit before you. I would vote you up but I can't just yet :). Thanks for your time helping me out. –  Marquis Feb 12 '13 at 19:39

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