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So this is my page: http://www.mysecretathens.gr/kulte_test/coming_soon.html and the greek fonts wont display, why is that?

I use Open Sans, greek script and I've put an html iso tag in the beginning, but still no Greek characters.

<html lang="el">
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What do you mean? I can see Γειά σας – Juan Mendes Feb 12 '13 at 18:12
    
I don't, I see Γειά σας – Eric Goncalves Feb 12 '13 at 18:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are not telling your page to use UTF-8. The best way is to send an HTTP header.

Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8

The alternative is to let the webpage say what its encoding is

<meta charset='utf-8'> 

Note that Chrome correctly guesses it. The first way is preferred since it keeps your application more DRY since you already have to choose an encoding on the server.

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BOOOM! you are right man – a.litis Feb 12 '13 at 18:18
1  
@a.litis, please mark this answer as accepted. Note that you can use both methods, and using the meta tag too helps in cases where the page has been saved locally (so that no HTTP headers are present when opening it). And you could be triply sure by saving the page as “UTF-8 with BOM”. – Jukka K. Korpela Feb 12 '13 at 18:52
    
@JukkaK.Korpela Great comment on the fact that pages can be opened locally. I couldn't figure out why anyone would use the meta tag instead of HTTP headers. – Juan Mendes Feb 12 '13 at 18:57
    
@JuanMendes, I meant using meta in addition to an HTTP header, not instead of it. But there are situations where authors cannot affect HTTP headers (due to server settings); then they have to use just meta and/or BOM (if the server announces no encoding in headers) or be stuck to using a specific encoding (if the server announces an encoding and you can’t change that). – Jukka K. Korpela Feb 12 '13 at 20:34

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