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This program isn't using all the cpu power. I was expecting it to take over the cpu and run the code the fastest possible, but it only use 10 max

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(void) {
    unsigned long long x = 600851475143;
    unsigned long long i = x-1;

    while(i <= x) {
            cout << "\r";
            cout << i;

            if((x % i) == 0) {
                    cout << "\n\n";
                    cout << i;

                    break;
            }

            i--;
    }

    system("pause");
}

it only goes to a max of 10%

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3  
Because it only maxes out one of the cores. –  Roman R. Feb 12 '13 at 18:21
1  
Due to the simplicity of your program, it only needs 10% of the CPU to run... –  MyCodeSucks Feb 12 '13 at 18:22
3  
It's because of your couts. –  Gunther Fox Feb 12 '13 at 18:24
1  
Maybe if you have your program calculate every prime number between 1 and 100,000,000,000,000. Throw some BigInts in there for fun. –  MadHenchbot Feb 12 '13 at 18:24
2  
Making a program use all cores is a fundamentally hard problem. It's called multithreading (or parallel programming, or multiprocessing, etc.). There are books about it. The short version is that you need to divide the work into pieces, create threads, and give each thread a piece of the work. –  dspeyer Feb 12 '13 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

The speed is probably limited by the speed of the output device. If you pipe the output to a file on disk, it'll be limited by the disk speed. If you just write to a console, it'll be limited by the speed of the console. Either way, the CPU will rarely be the limit.

Edit: since some people apparently don't quite understand the code, perhaps it's best to simplify it a bit. Let's simplify the loop by leaving out the if statement, leaving just:

unsigned long long x = 600851475143;
unsigned long long i = x-1;

while(i <= x) {
        cout << "\r";
        cout << i;
        i--;
}

So, what this does is start from 600851475143, count down to 0, then stop when i wraps around to std::numeric_limits<unsigned long long>::max() (typically 264-1).

Now, if we add the if statement back in, we can mostly ignore the body that it controls, but we do also get a remainder operation happening every iteration. Without that, the CPU usage would almost certainly be substantially lower still (though the exact number is likely to depend heavily on the hardware -- e.g., if you write the output to a disk, the disk's sustained bandwidth will be the controlling factor).

share|improve this answer
    
Often that's the case, but this program hardly outputs anything at all. –  dspeyer Feb 12 '13 at 18:27
    
@dspeyer: That doesn't change the fact that essentially all it does is write output. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 12 '13 at 18:28
    
Essentially all it does is arithmetic and decide not to write output. –  dspeyer Feb 12 '13 at 18:30
    
@dspeyer I suspect the amount of output is not relevant - it's the overhead of having to write to cout every loops v.s the extremely minimal work the CPU has to do (a couple of conditionals, and a counter decrement). –  JBentley Feb 12 '13 at 18:32
1  
@dspeyer: Obviously not, or the OP wouldn't have asked the question he did. Just for one possibility, standard output doesn't have to be line buffered -- it can be unbuffered, in which case your notion of how it will work is 100% false from beginning to end. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 12 '13 at 19:04

Because you are making blocking I/O calls via cout. Remove the cout statements and it will consume more cpu.

Whenever a thread is blocked on an I/O operation to complete, including stdout which waits for the console to print, the thread is an blocked state. Hence, no CPU time on that thread until the blocking operation is complete. stdout, the kernel, and the console all provide a little bit of buffering to prevent an I/O block, but eventually a program writing fast enough will exceed the buffering provided.

Note. On Windows, this program (with the cout print statements removed) will only use as a maximum of one core of CPU. If you are on a quad core, it will only consume 25% of CPU as reported on Windows task manager.

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2  
Would the downvoter care to share his criticism? –  selbie Feb 12 '13 at 18:39
    
I didn't downvote, but perhaps the downvoter wanted a bit more explanation of why I/O calls equates to less CPU usage. It's probably obvious to most people, but perhaps not to the OP. –  JBentley Feb 12 '13 at 18:52
    
I downvoted. See the discussion on the other (roughly equivalent) answer. When you actually run the program, those cout calls don't block -- they just fill up a buffer inside the process. –  dspeyer Feb 12 '13 at 19:04
    
@dspeyer The effect on performance of buffering would seem to me to be hardware dependent, and it's conceivable that more time could be spent on cout (whether buffering or actually outputting) than performing arithmetic. –  JBentley Feb 12 '13 at 19:25
    
I answered this question based on real experience of writing my own code to force cpu usage. While all I/O operations are afforded some buffering by the kernel and the C-Runtime, if you write faster than the console can display, you will block writing to stdout. Hence, blocking I/O calls implicitly put the thread out of the Running state and into a Blocked state. The CPU won't spend cycles on a blocked thread. Hence, the program will consume more CPU when it doesn't have to make any I/O calls. –  selbie Feb 12 '13 at 21:58

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