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I am trying to solve a problem which involves a giant 2-D screen (40000 * 40000 points) . There are some invalid points, and I have been given a rectangular window . All the points to the top-left of invalid points which fit within the rectangular window are invalidated as well.

I need to build a data structure which would support operations such as : 1) Find how many valid points i have to work on. 2) Query if a certain point is valid or not.

Based on my research, I have considered segment/interval trees, but I can't understand them fully, plus not sure if they can handle 2-D points.

Could anyone give me some nice article/implementation with a detailed description of a data structure which would enable above operations?

Thanks, Rohit

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2 Answers 2

It's the "Dead pixels" problem of this years facebook hackercup. Please see the official solution with code and explanation.

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All the points to the top-left of invalid points which fit within the rectangular window are invalidated as well.

So if x1,y1 is invalid, and x2<=x1 and y2<=y1, then x2,y2 is invalid as well. In that case, I'd store an ordered list of defining points, i.e. the bottom-right point of every invalid rectangle. Your list could be ordered such that x[i+1] > x[i] and y[i+1] < y[i]. This works if you omit all points which are already implied invalid by some other point. On this ordered list, you could then perform your operations.

1) Find how many valid points i have to work on.

You could iterate over the list, and for each point use a rectangular strip such that no two such strips overlap.

2) Query if a certain point is valid or not.

Given a point xp,yp, you can use binary search to locate a defining point which makes this one invalid. If the x coordinate of a defining point is too small, you have to look in higher positions, whereas if the y coordinate is too small, you'd search lower positions. If you find one where both are too small, you know that the pixel is valid. Otherwise you'll find one where both coordinates are large enough, meaning your given pixel is invalid as well.

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