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I have some problem regarding the following code :

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{ int a=6,b=2,g;
  a>b?g=a:g=b;
 }

this is executing properly without any error. But if seen properly, this should have given a Lvalue Required error. (a>b?g=a:g) is the actual expression since no parenthesis is being used as a>b?g=a:(g=b); and the value b is being assigned to the constant value obtained after solving the expression on the left of the second assignment (=) operator, which is an error for sure. Please help on this topic.

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What compiler? GCC 4.6.3 here and it breaks like it should. –  netcoder Feb 12 '13 at 18:34
    
This gives t.c:4:12: error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment (as expected) when I compile it. –  Chris Dodd Feb 12 '13 at 18:35
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4 Answers 4

The result of the conditional operator is never a lvalue in C.

If you didn't get a diagnostic with the statement with the conditional expression, it is not C. Check you are using a C compiler (and not a C++ compiler - the rules for the conditional operator are different in C++) and that the ISO mode is enabled.

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While it's true that the ternary operation would compile in C++, the code itself shouldn't compile in C++ anyway, because main returns void. –  netcoder Feb 12 '13 at 18:40
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The ternary operator is itself an Rvalue. It doesn't exactly do control flow, more gives a value out given a condition.

To fix, try g = a > b ? a : b.

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True, but you missed the point. That doesn't answer the question: OP asked why he didn't get an error, not how to fix the error that he didn't get. –  netcoder Feb 12 '13 at 18:36
    
Oh yeah. I just saw the code and assumed it was broken after a skim, sorry. –  slugonamission Feb 12 '13 at 18:37
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Do not do that:

a>b?g=a:g=b;

try this:

g = (a>b)?a:b;
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Move the g= part to the beginning:

g=a>b?a:b;

That will do what you want...

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