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union LowLevelNumber
{
 unsigned int n;
 struct
 {
  unsigned int lowByte : 8;
  unsigned int highByte : 8;
  unsigned int upperLowByte : 8;
  unsigned int upperHighByte : 8;
 } bytes;
 struct
 {
  unsigned int lowWord : 16;
  unsigned int highWord : 16;
 } words;     
};

This union allows me to access the unsigned integer byte or word-wise. However, the code looks rather ugly:

var.words.lowWord = 0x66;

Is there a way which would allow me to write code like this:

var.lowWord = 0x66;

Update:
This is really about writing short / beautiful code as in the example above. The union solution itself does work, I just don't want to write .words or .bytes everytime I access lowWord or lowByte.

share|improve this question
    
You are relying on implementation-defined behavior w.r.t. order of bit-fields and representation of integers in a union. This will break when endianness changes, and maybe even between different compilers. See C99 draft 6.7.2.1 #9 and 6.5.2.3 #5. –  starblue Sep 29 '09 at 21:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
union LowLevelNumber {
    unsigned int n;
    struct {
        unsigned int lowByte : 8;
        unsigned int highByte : 8;
        unsigned int upperLowByte : 8;
        unsigned int upperHighByte : 8;
    };
    struct {
        unsigned int lowWord : 16;
        unsigned int highWord : 16;
    };
};

Note the removed bytes and words names.

share|improve this answer
    
it's as easy as that - thanks :) –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:08
    
You're welcome. It's not that I mind property emulation approach, but I didn't expect you to fall for one given the question you asked and the answers you've been given. ;-) I have the feeling someone will come and suggest that you use java instead ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 27 '09 at 17:16
    
I think you should use Java instead. –  John Gietzen Sep 27 '09 at 17:25
    
Nice try, but I'm afraid after behrooz' answer you're a bit late ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 27 '09 at 17:26

C++

Would http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stl/bitset/ serve for your needs?

Plain C version would look something like this:

int32 foo;

//...

//Set to 0x66 at the low byte
foo &= 0xffffff00;
foo |= 0x66;

This is probably going to be more maintainable down the road than writing a custom class/union, because it follows the typical C idiom.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see why this is an improvement to the union above –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:14
    
It's an improvement because the next guy to read your code(or you in 2 years) isn't going to scratch his head wondering what in the world is going on, and have to hunt around for the union code...oh...and your code might brutally fail on a 64-bit machine, too. –  Paul Nathan Sep 27 '09 at 17:38
    
I'd even say that foo.LowByte = 0x66 is more readable than your code. It will only fail on 64 bit machine if the compiler model is not LLP. –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:58
    
The 64 bit issue can easily be solved via a #define –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 18:00
1  
Ah, so your solution requires fiddlyness to make work in the future. My solution won't, plus it is C idiom. Best of luck. –  Paul Nathan Sep 27 '09 at 18:36

You can make

short& loword() { return (short&)(*(void*)&m_source); }

and use it if you don't care parenthesis.

Or you can go fancy

public class lowordaccess
{
   unsigned int m_source;
public:
   void assign(unsigned int& source) { m_source = source; }
   short& operator=(short& value) { ... set m_source }
   operator short() { return m_source & 0xFF; }
}

and then

struct LowLevelNumber
{
   LowLevelNumber() { loword.assign(number); }

   unsigned int number;
   lowordaccess loword;
}
var.loword = 1;
short n = var.loword;

The latter technique is a known property emulation in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
I really like your approach! very nice –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:12
    
While I appreciate this, and the code that I present is kind of cool and can be useful in other situations, I didn't really test it, and I personally think that hacker's approach is much more simplier and fits better with the very problem. –  queen3 Sep 27 '09 at 17:39
    
And my code have side effects, like, there're problems doing &var.loword, etc. –  queen3 Sep 27 '09 at 17:40
2  
And by the way you could just do "{ MyNumberCtor() { loword = (short)((char*)&n + 1); } short& loword; }" i.e. have reference field named loword. You don't really need go fancy ;-) –  queen3 Sep 27 '09 at 17:44
    
Although I upvoted the last comment and find it generally useful (along with this whole answer, which I also upvoted), I really doubt introducing this overhead having 32 bits of data would make sense. Just think of what overhead would it be in case of 64-bit address space ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 27 '09 at 19:49

You could easily wrap that in a class and use get/set accessors.

share|improve this answer
    
this makes code equally "bloated" and is not better than using a union –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:03
    
It would allow you to implement something that's actually portable without breaking the interface, and I don't see how it'd be more bloated. –  jalf Sep 27 '09 at 17:09
    
bloated in the sense i outlined in my question: i want to ommit the accessors (.words, .bytes in this case) –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:13
    
it would omit the accessors. You cauld have a GetHighWord function directly in your class. –  John Gietzen Sep 27 '09 at 17:33
    
yes, but I was asking for a way to write something like var.lowWord = 0x66; –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 17:37

Using a union for this is bad, because it is not portable w.r.t. endianness.

Use accessor functions and implement them with bit masks and shifts.

share|improve this answer
    
true, but how would you write one class which would work with both types of endianess? –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 18:17
    
Implement them with bit masks and shifts. That works independently of endianness. –  starblue Sep 27 '09 at 19:02
    
yeah but youo still need to have #defines in order to differentiate between big / little endianess. I don't see why I couldn't also do this with a union –  SDD Sep 27 '09 at 20:46
    
No, you don't need to differentiate between endiannesses! For example, accessing the high 16 bits of a 32 bit int is always (n >> 16) & 0xffff. –  starblue Sep 28 '09 at 11:32
1  
The question is, though, whether it's correct to refer to the most significant word as a high word ;-) And that makes me doubt if you can talk about endianness breakage at all here. It depends on what do you expect it to return. Depending on that you may safely say that what you do breaks with different endianness. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 28 '09 at 13:55

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