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I have a list where each list element itself holds another list with several names objects. Each of these named object is a vector of the same length. My goal is to efficiently combine the related objects (those of the same name) into a matrix by concatening vectors.

Here's an example of the type of structure I'm working with. However, in the current application it's coming from mclapply as it is a parallelized multilevel model, and I don't think there's a way around getting a list of lists back.

> test=lapply(1:2,function(x){out = list(); out$t=rnorm(3)+x; out$p =rnorm(3)+ x+.1; return(out)})
> test
[[1]]
[[1]]$t
[1] 0.5950165 0.8827352 0.5614947

[[1]]$p
[1] 2.6144102 1.9688743 0.6241944


[[2]]
[[2]]$t
[1] 2.562030 1.832571 3.018756

[[2]]$p
[1] 1.7431969 0.5305784 2.6935106

Here's a crude way to accomplish what I want

> t.matrix = cbind(test[[1]]$t,test[[2]]$t)
> t.matrix
           [,1]     [,2]
[1,]  2.2094525 2.634907
[2,] -0.2822453 2.440666
[3,]  1.1704518 2.483424

but instead I'd like to be able to do this for a very long list (around 1 million elements), and my current solution doesn't scale.

I suppose I could use a for loop, but it seems like there must be a better way to do it with clever use of reduce or unlist or sapply or something like that.

share|improve this question
1  
It's always nice when you're sharing these kinds of questions to use set.seed() so that we can compare the output we get with what you intend to get. –  Ananda Mahto Feb 12 '13 at 18:59
    
Thanks for the pointer! I'll be sure to do that in the future. –  Daniel Kessler Feb 12 '13 at 19:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
test <- lapply(1:4, function(x) { 
          out = list(); out$t=rnorm(3)+x; out$p =rnorm(3)+ x+.1; return(out)})

do.call(cbind, lapply(test, function(X) X[["t"]]))
## do.call(cbind, lapply(test, "[[", "t"))          ## Or, equivalently 
#           [,1]      [,2]     [,3]     [,4] 
# [1,] 0.7382887 0.9248296 4.205222 5.847823 
# [2,] 3.0321069 3.6806652 3.324739 3.695195 
# [3,] 2.3611483 1.9305901 1.574586 4.287534 

Or, to process both sets of list elements at once:

elems <- c("t", "p")
sapply(elems, function(E) {
     do.call(cbind,
             lapply(test, function(X) {
                 X[[E]]
             }))
}, simplify=FALSE)
# $t
#           [,1]       [,2]     [,3]     [,4]
# [1,] 1.9226614 0.66463844 2.558517 2.743381
# [2,] 3.0026400 0.03238983 2.195404 3.824127
# [3,] 0.9371057 3.54638107 2.968717 2.434471
# 
# $p
#           [,1]     [,2]     [,3]     [,4]
# [1,] 0.8544413 2.942780 4.693698 4.158212
# [2,] 0.7172070 2.381438 4.869630 3.503361
# [3,] 3.1369674 2.464447 2.484968 3.626174
share|improve this answer

What about using unlist(test, recursive = FALSE). It needs to be done in more than one step though, if you want "p" and "t" to be separate. Here they are together:

temp <- do.call(cbind, unlist(test, recursive = FALSE))
temp
             t         p        t        p
[1,] 0.3735462 2.6952808 2.487429 1.794612
[2,] 1.1836433 1.4295078 2.738325 3.611781
[3,] 0.1643714 0.2795316 2.575781 2.489843

Separating them out is pretty straightforward:

temp[, colnames(temp) %in% "t"]
#              t        t
# [1,] 0.3735462 2.487429
# [2,] 1.1836433 2.738325
# [3,] 0.1643714 2.575781
temp[, colnames(temp) %in% "p"]
#              p        p
# [1,] 2.6952808 1.794612
# [2,] 1.4295078 3.611781
# [3,] 0.2795316 2.489843

Here's the data I used:

set.seed(1)
test <- lapply(1:2, function(x) {
  out = list()
  out$t=rnorm(3)+x
  out$p =rnorm(3)+ x+.1
  return(out)
})
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, upvote for you. However, one hesitation I have with unlist is that the benchmarking I've seen here indicates that using unlist with names turned on is much much slower. I suppose I could use your solution and turn the useNames flag off, but that would make the reconstruction a bit trickier. –  Daniel Kessler Feb 12 '13 at 19:42
    
@DanielKessler, Thanks for sharing that link. I had no idea that retaining names when using unlist made the function that much slower! I guess a workaround if you know your data are nicely organized would be to select the odd numbered columns and the even numbered columns in the end, but that might be error prone. I think Josh's approach is definitely the most appropriate here. –  Ananda Mahto Feb 13 '13 at 8:02

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