Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been cutting and pasting some code snippets from an Amazon Kindle eBook into a text editor (JetBrains PhpStorm), and apparently each time it comes with some extended (>127) ASCII characters.

Is there simple cmd line sed/awk/tr command, or a simple OSX App to strip them out?

share|improve this question

closed as off topic by Ken White, martin clayton, Abizern, Laurent Etiemble, Jon Egerton Feb 13 '13 at 9:12

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Why is this considered off topic? stackoverflow.com/faq says questions may include "software tools commonly used by programmers". The question also adresses "a specific programming problem". Extended ASCII characters cause parsing problems in many IDEs/editors, diff/merge tools, and compilers/interpreters/browsers. This is a very real and specific problem+solution that affects programmers of all types. –  jpeskin Feb 13 '13 at 19:58
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to this blog post, here is a solution that worked well for me:

tr -cd '\11\12\15\40-\176' < infile > outfile

Note that if you get this error: tr: Illegal byte sequence, this can be solved by setting LANG=C via:

export LANG=C

(not sure why setting LANG=C helps, but that's what others with the same problem were doing)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Plain Clip has always been my go-to OS X app for stripping out unwanted characters/whitespace/etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.