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Why does the code below return true only for a = 1?

main(){
int a = 10;
if (true == a)
     cout<<"Why am I not getting executed";
}
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11 Answers 11

up vote 37 down vote accepted

When a Bool true is converted to an int, it's always converted to 1. Your code is thus, equivalent to:

main(){
   int a = 10;
   if (1 == a)
      cout<<"y i am not getting executed";
   }

This is part of the C++ standard, so it's something you would expect to happen with every C++ standards compliant compiler.

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I think you mean "it's always converted to 1" instead of "it's always converted to true" –  therefromhere Sep 29 '08 at 12:13
    
Oops, you're right, thanks! :) (Edited) –  paradoja Sep 29 '08 at 12:14
1  
Maybe a quick explanation of why it's the bool converted to int, not the int converted to bool? I mean, "because the C++ standard says so" covers most of it, but still... –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 12:30
    
The value of "true" when converted to int is compiler specific, or is that part of the standard? –  David Hill Sep 29 '08 at 12:52
1  
the author of the original code was probably thinking: if( true == bool(a) ), which will convert 10 to true. ie, bool(5) != 5. –  Aaron Sep 29 '08 at 22:38

The reason your print statement is not getting executed is because your boolean is getting implicitly converted to a number instead of the other way around. I.e. your if statement is equivalent to this: if (1 == a)

You could get around this by first explicitly converting it to a boolean:

main(){
int a = 10;
if (((bool)a) == true)
     cout<<"I am definitely getting executed";
}

In C/C++ false is represented as 0.

Everything else is represented as non zero. That is sometimes 1, sometimes anything else. So you should never test for equality (==) to something that is true.

Instead you should test for equality to something that is false. Since false has only 1 valid value.

Here we are testing for all non false values, any of them is fine:

main(){
int a = 10;
if (a)
     cout<<"I am definitely getting executed";
}

And one third example just to prove that it is safe to compare any integer that is considered false to a false (which is only 0):

main(){
int a = 0;
if (0 == false)
     cout<<"I am definitely getting executed";
}
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use function-style conversion or a C++ cast. C-style cases are evil. 'bool(a)' or 'static_cast<bool>(a)'. –  Aaron Sep 29 '08 at 22:39
    
Aaron, sorry that is nonsense :) "function-style cast" is semantically equivalent to a (T)x style cast, and it introduces ambiguities in addition. If anything, it's a matter of taste, but T(x) arguably has more problems than (T)x. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 1 '09 at 20:40

Your boolean is promoted to an integer, and becomes 1.

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in C and C++, 0 is false and anything but zero is true:

if ( 0 )
{
// never run
}

if ( 1 )
{
// always run
}

if ( var1 == 1 )
{
// run when var1 is "1"
}

When compiler calculates a boolean expression it is obliged to produce 0 or 1. Also, there's a couple handy typedefs and defines, which allow you to use "true" and "false" instead of 1 and 0 in your expressions.

So your code actually looks like this:

main(){
int a = 10;
if (1 == a)
     cout<<"y i am not getting executed";
}

You probably want:

main(){
int a = 10;
if (true == (bool)a)
     cout<<"if you want to explicitly use true/false";
}

or really just:

main(){
int a = 10;
if ( a )
     cout<<"usual C++ style";
}
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Because true is 1. If you want to test a for a non-zero value, just write if(a).

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2  
Eek. If you want to test for a non-zero value, write if(a!=0). 3 extra characters to say what you're actually thinking, instead of saying something that the language makes equivalent to what you're thinking. Bargain. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 12:27
    
It's 5 extra characters, because I would add spaces between the operator and its operands ;) –  OregonGhost Sep 29 '08 at 12:28
    
Oh, well, in that case point taken ;) I used to use if(a) a lot for pointers, meaning sort of "if there is an a". But eventually I decided that for me it wasn't really helping, and gave it up. –  Steve Jessop Sep 29 '08 at 12:35
    
I don't use it anymore as well, since I'm writing most code in C# today, where int cannot be converted to bool implicitly. C++ even encourages this style, e.g. with fstream, where you test like if (!myfile) {} etc. May be a good recommendation not to test numbers like this though. –  OregonGhost Sep 29 '08 at 12:55

I suggest you switch to a compiler that warns you about this... (VC++ yields this: warning C4806: '==' : unsafe operation: no value of type 'bool' promoted to type 'int' can equal the given constant; I don't have another compiler at hand.)

I agree with Lou Franco - you want to know if a variable is bigger than zero (or unequal to it), test for that.

Everything that's done implicitly by the compiler is hazardous if you don't know the last detail.

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Here is the way most people write that kind of code:

main(){
int a = 10;
if (a) // all non-zero satisfy 'truth'
     cout<<"y i am not getting executed";
}

I have also seen:

main(){
int a = 10;
if (!!a == true) // ! result is guaranteed to be == true or == false
     cout<<"y i am not getting executed";
}
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I wouldn't expect that code to be defined and you shouldn't depend on whatever behavior your compiler is giving you. Probably the true is being converted to an int (1), and a is not being converted to a bool (true) as you expect. Better to write what you mean (a != 0) then to depend on this (even if it turns out to be defined).

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something different from 0 (that is false) is not necessary true (that is 1)

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Because true is equal to 1. It is defined in a pre-proccesor directive, so all code with true in it is turnbed into 1 before compile time.

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Tha is just wrong ! true and false are symbols defined in the language and have nothing to do with the preprocessor (unlike in old C with TRUE and false) ! –  PierreBdR Sep 29 '08 at 12:13

Because a boolean is a bit in C/C++ and true is represented by 1, false by 0.

Update: as said in the comment my original Answer is false. So bypass it.

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C/C++ do not prescribe boolean to be a bit. In C++ bool size is implementation dependent. C has no bool type - it's really an integer. –  Steve Fallows Sep 29 '08 at 12:32
    
C99 has a bool type, of sorts, enabled by #include <stdbool.h>. But I agree that the bool type is not a bit in either C or C++. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '08 at 13:22
    
Thanks for the correction - haven't looked a pure C in a while. –  Steve Fallows Sep 29 '08 at 14:17

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