Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to abstract away my interface implementations by providing a factory/builder using generics. However, I'm running into an issue with multiple dispatch and C# generics at run time that's doing something that seems odd.

The basic scenario is I've defined several interfaces:

public interface IAddressModel
{
}

public interface IUserModel
{
}

Then I have a factory class to return the actual implementations:

public class Factory
{
    public T BuildModel<T>()
    {
        return BuildModel(default(T));
    }

    public object BuildModel(object obj)
    {
        //this is here because the compiler will complain about casting T to
        //the first inteface parameter in the first defined BuildModel method
        return null;
    }

    public IAddressModel BuildModel(IAddressModel iModel)
    {
        //where AddressModel inherits from IAddressModel
        return new AddressModel();
    }

    public IUserModel BuildModel(IUserModel iModel)
    {
        //where UserModel inherits from IUserModel
        return new UserModel(); 
    }
}

The issue is when the factory is called like this: new Factory().BuildModel<IAddressModel>() The BuildModel(...) method that is dispatched at run time from generics is always the least derived form of T, in this case always object.

However, if you call new Factory().BuildModel(default(IAddressModel)); the correct method is displatched (most likely because this is done at compile time). It seems that dynamic dispatch with generics doesn't check the methods for the most derived type even though the method called should be the same whether it's done at compile time or run time. Ideally I'd like to make the BuildModel(...) methods private and only expose the generic method. Is there another way to get dynamic displatch to call the correct method at run time? I've tried changing the BuildModel<>() implementation to return BuildModel((dynamic)default(T)) but this throws a run time error about not being able to determine which method to dispatch. Is there maybe a way to do this with contravariance and more interfaces?

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Feb 12 '13 at 20:13
    
Have you considered new Factory<IAddressModel>().BuildModel() instead? –  Bobson Feb 12 '13 at 20:18
    
@Bobson - Yes, I've tried moving the generics to the class level instead of the method level, it doesn't make any difference with the run time dispatch. –  Raven Feb 12 '13 at 20:20
    
I don't think this is a run time vs compile time issue. To the best of my knowledge, unless you're using dynamic, generics are all resolved at compile time, just like regular types. And you can't use dynamic because default(T) will be null, and thus it can't determine what it's supposed to be. I suspect this is part of why the standard for Factories is to use a switch... –  Bobson Feb 12 '13 at 20:45
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You might be able do the dispatch yourself based on the argument type T:

public class Factory
{
    private Dictionary<Type, Func<object>> builders = new Dictionary<Type, Func<object>>
    {
        { typeof(IAddressModel), BuildAddressModel },
        { typeof(IUserModel), BuildUserModel }
    };

    public T Build<T>()
    {
        Func<object> buildFunc;
        if (builders.TryGetValue(typeof(T), out buildFunc))
        {
            return (T)buildFunc();
        }
        else throw new ArgumentException("No builder for type " + typeof(T).Name);
    }

    private static IAddressModel BuildAddressModel()
    {
        return new AddressModel();
    }

    private static IUserModel BuildUserModel()
    {
        return new UserModel();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The current state of the code requires an explicit cast to compile.

public T BuildModel<T>()
{
    return (T)BuildModel(default(T));
}

BuildModel is treating T polymorphically as an object. BuildModel does not know that T is an IAddressModel or an IUserModel unless you define such a restriction:

public T BuildModel<T>() where T: IAddressModel
{            
    Console.WriteLine(typeof(T));
    return (T)BuildModel(default(T));
}

Now, the compiler has enough information to recognize that T is an IAddressModel. But, what you are after is for object to become a more derived parameter (covarient) which is not type safe. In other words, C# does not support covarient parameter types because it is not type safe.

You can still achieve factory like behavior via conditional logic:

    public T BuildModel<T>()
    {
        T result = default(T);

        if (typeof(T) == typeof(IAddressModel))
            result = (T)BuildModel((IAddressModel)result);
        else if (typeof(T) == typeof(IUserModel))
            result = (T)BuildModel((IUserModel)result);

        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.