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I would like to remove comma , at the end of each line in my file. How can I do it other than using substring function in awk. please suggest me.Thanks

Sample Input

        SUPPLIER_PROC_ID BIGINT NOT NULL,
        BTCH_NBR INTEGER NOT NULL,
        RX_BTCH_SUPPLIER_SEQ_NBR INTEGER NOT NULL,
        CORRN_ID INTEGER NOT NULL,
        RX_CNT BYTEINT NOT NULL,
        DATA_TYP_CD BYTEINT NOT NULL,
        DATA_PD_CD BYTEINT NOT NULL,
        CYC_DT DATE NOT NULL,
        BASE_DT DATE NOT NULL,
        DATA_LOAD_DT DATE NOT NULL,
        DATA_DT DATE NOT NULL,
        SUPPLIER_DATA_SRC_CD BYTEINT NOT NULL,
        RX_CHNL_CD BYTEINT NOT NULL,
        MP_IMS_ID INTEGER NOT NULL,
        MP_LOC_ID NUMERIC(3,0),
        MP_IMS_ID_ACTN_CD BYTEINT NOT NULL,
        NPI_ID BIGINT,
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up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can use sed:

sed 's/,$//' file > file.nocomma

and to remove whatever last character:

sed 's/.$//' file > file.nolast
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Rather than sending the output to a newfile you can also append the -i switch to sed to write i to 'file' – ubuntu101010101 Aug 14 '14 at 7:27
2  
@ubuntu101010101 Indeed but using this option might trigger a sed error instead. The question is tagged Unix. Using a non POSIX GNUism would make my suggestion not portable. – jlliagre Aug 14 '14 at 14:45

Try doing this :

awk '{print substr($0, 1, length($0)-1)}' file.txt

This is more generic than just removing the final comma but any last character

If you'd want to only remove the last comma with awk :

awk '{gsub(/,$/,""); print}' file.txt
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I was just trying something like this, and for some reason you need a length($0) without the -1... it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense to me either. But whatever, it's bash, as long as it works. – enriched Feb 20 '15 at 22:11
2  
String indexes in awk start at 1, so it should be substr( $0, 1, length($0)-1 ). – schieferstapel May 17 '15 at 16:08

alternative commands that does same job

tr -d ",$" < infile
awk 'gsub(",$","")' infile
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2  
Your tr suggestion is incorrect. It will remove all commas wherever they are, not only the last one. Your awk based one is ok although sub instead of gsub would be enough. There can't be more than one end of line per line. – jlliagre Apr 3 '14 at 11:24
    
The tr suggestion will also remove $ characters that might appear in the file to process. – jlliagre Apr 3 '14 at 15:21

This Perl code removes commas at the end of the line:

perl -pe 's/,$//' file > file.nocomma

This variation still works if there is whitespace after the comma:

perl -lpe 's/,\s*$//' file > file.nocomma

This variation edits the file in-place:

perl -i -lpe 's/,\s*$//' file

This variation edits the file in-place, and makes a backup file.bak:

perl -i.bak -lpe 's/,\s*$//' file
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An awk code based on RS and ORS.

awk '1' RS=',\n' ORS='\n' file

or:

awk 'BEGIN{RS=",\n";ORS="\n"}1'

Explanation

awk allows us to use different record (line) regex separators, we just need to exclude the comma from the one used for the output, the ORS, both include the line breaks.

Note: what that 1 means?

Short answer, It's just a shortcut to avoid using the print statement. In awk when a condition gets matched the default action is to print the input line, example:

$ echo "test" |awk '1'
test

That's because 1 will be always true, so this expression is equivalent to:

$ echo "test"|awk '1==1'
test
$ echo "test"|awk '{if (1==1){print}}'
test

Documentation

Check Record Splitting with Standard awk and Output Separators.

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