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I'm working on a Python program that needs to be able to run even if some of the libraries it needs for some features are missing. (EDIT: I wrote a little code to implement the best suggested solution and it's here, with a doctest here.)

I solved this by putting the import statements for such libraries inline to the functions that use them, rather than at the top of the Python file. That means that you can load the file perfectly well even if you don't have the library, though of course you'll throw an ImportError if you try to call one of the functions.

This has worked so well that I find myself sometimes doing this for standard library modules as well - but now I'm wondering if I'm incurring some hidden cost by doing so?

Baseline code:

import numpy

def foo(): 
  return numpy.array([])

def bar(): 
  return numpy.array([1, 2, 3])

Code with inline imports:

def foo(): 
  import numpy
  return numpy.array([])

def bar(): 
  import numpy
  return numpy.array([1, 2, 3])

EDIT:

I agree completely about not inlining standard library code - obviously bad.

I now think that the guarded import is the correct solution.

In particular, I did some timing tests on the calls, and while the time difference probably isn't significant for most applications, it is appreciable (fine line, I know!)

In the trivial case

import numpy
def f():
  return numpy

takes about 180ms on my machine for 100,000 repetitions but

def f():
  import numpy
  return numpy

takes about 870ms.

Very rough takeaway is that this costs as much as four trivial function calls - noticeable but not significant in most cases. Still, best to avoid if it costs you nothing to do so.

In experimenting, I also realized another downside to inline imports - it's that these imports go off at an unpredictable time, when the function is called. In my application, which has real-time elements, this is unacceptable.

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Now I'm looking at the disassembled code and there are definitely extra instructions added in the inline case. I'm going to try timing them... – Tom Swirly Feb 12 '13 at 20:25
    
Performance probably won't matter, but the ugly cluttering of functions is bad - I'd avoid this for that reason alone. – Latty Feb 12 '13 at 20:27
up vote 6 down vote accepted

There's no appreciable performance hit, but it makes your code messy. If you decide to add a new import or have to change an old one, you have to change it everywhere instead of just in one place.

Also, you should be sure this is documented. Some users may be irritated if the library appears to import correctly but then fails much later when a specific function is called. In addition, although there's no overall performance hit, there can be a performance "reshuffling" which causes slowdowns in unexpected places. The first time you call a function that imports numpy, it will have to do the import, and this will take time. Users may also find this undesirable and want all the slow imports to be done up front.

You can easily get a similar effect with all-at-the-top imports:

try:
    import numpy
except ImportError:
    warnings.warn("Numpy not available, some functions may not work!")

Later attempts to use functions that try to access numpy will now fail with a NameError. By using a warning (or just a printed/logged message), you also provide advance notice that some things will not work, instead of just suddenly failing later.

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1  
You could also assign an object that gives a relevant exception from __getattribute__() to numpy, just to make it super-clear. – Latty Feb 12 '13 at 20:26
    
Lattyware: great idea, I'm going to do just that! The system is going to be used by artists so intelligible error messages is a priority. – Tom Swirly Feb 12 '13 at 20:46
    
It turns out that you really need to use \_\_getattr\_\_ - I updated my original question with a link to code implementing this as well as a doctest. – Tom Swirly Feb 12 '13 at 21:09

You're not following PEP 8 by doing this. In the case of standard library imports, you're doing so without good reason, which is doubly bad and enough for some people to shun your code (or at least politely nag that you shouldn't do it).

Of course, PEP 8 doesn't say that for no reason at all. In this case, there's an even better reason than personal preference and uniformity: If you put all imports at the top, one can very easily find the dependencies of a module. This becomes more of a hassle if the imports are spread all over the file. Moreover, now practically every call to your library can raise ImportError, which is rather unfortunate: The usual workflow is to import everything, and if it can be imported, it's assumed to work (this is a useful manual test when setting up a virtualenv). Not-quite-well-written code might start doing things like I/O, call your function in between (not expecting an ImportError), and then be surprised by the error and fail to clean up properly.

There is also a slight overhead, in that a few extra instructions will be executed each time a function containing an import is called. However, this overhead is rather small for most purposes, and it won't import the module twice (or thrice, or umpteen times). Of course, it also violates DRY.

When confronted with this problem, I and other people have opted to put the import at the top of the file anyway, surrounded with try: ... except ImportError:. Then you can assign a dummy value, emit a warning, log something, or do whatever else makes sense in your case. You might even import a replacement module (e.g. when supporting old Python versions that don't have certain modules) or a stub module you supply yourself.

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Not really.

The import will only happen once, but it might happen at an unexpected time (for the user), namely the first time the function is called that does the import.

Also, it's a matter of readability - if you follow the convention to do the imports at the top, every reader of your code knows immediately what its dependencies are. That clarity may get lost when the import is happening on line 284 of your module...

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No, there should be no downsides or hidden costs when doing this. Modules are cached and only executed once, even if you import them multiple times. The import then just (re)sets the local reference to the module.

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