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Is it evil to redefine the assert macro?

Some folks recommend using your own macro ASSERT(cond) rather than redefining the existing, standard, assert(cond) macro. But this does not help if you have a lot of legacy code using assert(), that you don't want to make source code changes to, that you want to intercept, regularize, the assertion reporting of.

I have done

 #undef assert
 #define assert(cond)  ... my own assert code ...

in situations such as the above - code already using assert, that I wanted to extend the assert-failing behavior of - when I wanted to do stuff like

1) printing extra error information to make the assertions more useful

2) automatically invoking a debugger or stack track on an assert

... this, 2), can be done without redefining assert, by implementing a SIGABRT signal handler.

3) converting assertion failures into throws.

... this, 3), cannot be done by a signal handler - since you can't throw a C++ exception from a signal handler. (At least not reliably.)

Why might I want to make assert throw? Stacked error handling.

I do this latter usually not because I want the program to continue running after the assertion (although see below), but because I like using exceptions to provide better context on errors. I often do:

int main() {
  try { some_code(); }
  catch(...) { 
     std::string err = "exception caught in command foo";
     std::cerr << err;
     exit(1);;
  }
}

void some_code() { 
  try { some_other_code(); }
  catch(...) { 
     std::string err = "exception caught when trying to set up directories";
     std::cerr << err;
     throw "unhandled exception, throwing to add more context";
  }
}

void some_other_code() { 
  try { some_other2_code(); }
  catch(...) { 
     std::string err = "exception caught when trying to open log file " + logfilename;
     std::cerr << err;
     throw "unhandled exception, throwing to add more context";
  }
}

etc.

I.e. the exception handlers add a bit more error context, and then rethrow.

Sometimes I have the exception handlers print, e.g. to stderr.

Sometimes I have the exception handlers push onto a stack of error messages. (Obviously that won't work when the problem is running out of memory.)

** These assert exceptions still exit ... **

Somebody who commented on this post, @IanGoldby, said "The idea of an assert that doesn't exit doesn't make any sense to me."

Lest I was not clear: I usually have such exceptions exit. But eventually, perhaps not immediately.

E.g. instead of

#include <iostream>
#include <assert.h>

#define OS_CYGWIN 1

void baz(int n)
{
#if OS_CYGWIN
  assert( n == 1 && "I don't know how to do baz(1) on Cygwin). Should not call baz(1) on Cygwin." );
#else
  std::cout << "I know how to do baz(n) most places, and baz(n), n!=1 on Cygwin, but not baz(1) on Cygwin.\n";
#endif
}
void bar(int n)
{
  baz(n);
}
void foo(int n)
{
  bar(n);
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  foo( argv[0] == std::string("1") );
}

producing only

% ./assert-exceptions
assertion "n == 1 && "I don't know how to do baz(1) on Cygwin). Should not call baz(1) on Cygwin."" failed: file "assert-exceptions.cpp", line 9, function: void baz(int)
/bin/sh: line 1: 22180 Aborted                 (core dumped) ./assert-exceptions/
%

you might do

#include <iostream>
//#include <assert.h>
#define assert_error_report_helper(cond) "assertion failed: " #cond
#define assert(cond)  {if(!(cond)) { std::cerr << assert_error_report_helper(cond) "\n"; throw assert_error_report_helper(cond); } }
     //^ TBD: yes, I know assert needs more stuff to match the definition: void, etc.

#define OS_CYGWIN 1

void baz(int n)
{
#if OS_CYGWIN
  assert( n == 1 && "I don't know how to do baz(1) on Cygwin). Should not call baz(1) on Cygwin." );
#else
  std::cout << "I know how to do baz(n) most places, and baz(n), n!=1 on Cygwin, but not baz(1) on Cygwin.\n";
#endif
}
void bar(int n)
{
  try {
baz(n);
  }
  catch(...) {
std::cerr << "trying to accomplish bar by baz\n";
    throw "bar";
  }
}
void foo(int n)
{
  bar(n);
}

int secondary_main(int argc, char** argv)
{
     foo( argv[0] == std::string("1") );
}
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  try {
return secondary_main(argc,argv);
  }
  catch(...) {
std::cerr << "main exiting because of unknown exception ...\n";
  }
}

and get the slightly more meaningful error messages

assertion failed: n == 1 && "I don't know how to do baz(1) on Cygwin). Should not call baz(1) on Cygwin."
trying to accomplish bar by baz
main exiting because of unknown exception ...

I should not have to explain why these context sensitive error messages can be more meaningful. E.g. the user may not have the slightest idea why baz(1) is being called. It may well ne a pogram error - on cygwin, you may have to call cygwin_alternative_to_baz(1).

But the user may understand what "bar" is.

Yes: this is not guaranteed to work. But, for that matter, asserts are not guaranteed to work, if they do anything more complicated than calling in the abort handler.

write(2,"error baz(1) has occurred",64);

and even that is not guaranteed to work (there's a secure bug in this invocation.)

E.g. if malloc or sbrk has failed.

Why might I want to make assert throw? Testing

The other big reason that I have occasionally redefined assert has been to write unit tests for legacy code, code that uses assert to signal errors, which I am not allowed to rewrite.

If this code is library code, then it is convenient to wrap calls via try/catch. See if the error is detected, and go on.

Oh, heck, I might as well admit it: sometimes I wrote this legacy code. And I deliberately used assert() to signal errors. Because I could not rely on the user doing try/catch/throw - in fact, oftentimes the same code must be used in a C/C++ environment. I did not want to use my own ASSERT macro - because, believe it or not, ASSERT often conflicts. I find code that is littered with FOOBAR_ASSERT() and A_SPECIAL_ASSERT() ugly. No... simply using assert() by itself is elegant, works basically. And can be extended.... if it is okay to override assert().

Anyway, whether the code that uses assert() is mine or from someone else: sometimes you want code to fail, by calling SIGABRT or exit(1) - and sometimes you want it to throw.

I know how to test code that fails by exit(a) or SIGABRT - something like

for all  tests do
   fork
      ... run test in child
   wait
   check exit status

but this code is slow. Not always portable. And often runs several thousand times slower

for all  tests do
   try {
      ... run test in child
   } catch (... ) {
      ...
   }

This is a riskier than just stacking error message context since you may continue operating. But you can always choose types of exceptions to cactch.

Meta-Observation

I am with Andrei Alexandresciu in thinking that exceptions are the best known method to report errors in code that wants to be secure. (Because the programmer cannot forget to check an error return code.)

If this is right ... if there is a phase change in error reporting, from exit(1)/signals/ to exceptions ... one still has the question of how to live with the legacy code.

And, overall - there are several error reporting schemes. If different libraries use different schemes, how make them live together.

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3  
This may be more appropriate on Programmers, as you are looking for a consensus on the culture of programming rather than a solution to a particular programming problem. –  dmckee Feb 12 '13 at 20:33
3  
You should define your own ASSERT. Redefining something from the standard technically can lead to undefined behavior. If you have a lot of legacy code that needs to change, then you need a good code editor or IDE with refactoring tools. –  Adrian McCarthy Feb 12 '13 at 20:37
1  
Altough I agree, that an own definition could avoid some problems, I don't believe that redefining assert() is that evil, as one can do it per compilation unit. I did it myself on certain platforms, it isn't discouraged by the language specification either: See 7.2.1.1 The assert macro in C99 Rationale 5.10 : open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/C99RationaleV5.10.pdf –  Sam Feb 12 '13 at 20:49
    
most folks recommend writing your own assert :-) –  Claptrap Feb 13 '13 at 6:47
    
@AdrianMcCarthy: refactoring tools don't help when you are not allowed to edit the code. Or at least not supposed to. E.g. when the code comes from somewhere else, an outside provider, and has to track. // Michael Feathers, in his book "Working with Legacy Code", talks about several ways of refactoring when you can't edit the code. Macro redefinition is one of the standard ways. –  Krazy Glew Feb 14 '13 at 20:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Redefining a Standard macro is an ugly idea, and you can be the behaviour's technically undefined, but in the end macros are just source code substitutions and it's hard to see how it could cause problems, as long as the assertion causes your program to exit.

That said, your intended substitition may not be reliably used if any code in the translation unit after your definition itself redefines assert, which suggests a need for a specific order of includes etc. - damned fragile.

If your assert substitutes code that doesn't exit you open up new problems. There are pathological edge cases where your ideas about throwing instead could fail, such as:

int f(int n)
{
    try
    {
        assert(n != 0);
        call_some_library_that_might_throw(n);
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        // ignore errors...
    }
    return 12 / n;
}

Above, a value of 0 for n starts crashing the application instead of stopping it with a sane error message: any explanation in the thrown message won't be seen.

I am with Andrei Alexandresciu in thinking that exceptions are the best known method to report errors in code that wants to be secure. (Because the programmer cannot forget to check an error return code.)

I don't recall Andrei saying quite that - do you have a quote? He's certainly thought very carefully about how to create objects that encourage reliable exception handling, but I've never heard/seen him suggest that a stop-the-program assert is inappropriate in certain cases. Assertions are a normal way of enforcing invariants - there's definitely a line to be drawn concerning which potential assertions can be continued from and which can't, but on one side of that line assertions continue to be useful.

The choice between returning an error value and using exceptions is the traditional ground for the kind of argument/preference you mention, as they're more legitimately alternatives.

If this is right ... if there is a phase change in error reporting, from exit(1)/signals/ to exceptions ... one still has the question of how to live with the legacy code.

As above, you shouldn't try to migrate all existing exit() / assert etc. to exceptions. In many cases, there will be no way to meaningfully continue processing, and throwing an exception just creates doubt about whether the issue will be recorded properly and lead to the intended termination.

And, overall - there are several error reporting schemes. If different lubraries use different schemes, how make them live together.

Where that becomes a real issue, you'd generally select one approach and wrap the non-conforming libraries with a layer that provides the error handling you like.

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The idea of an assert that doesn't exit doesn't make any sense to me. An assert should only ever be used to document a condition that the developer thinks must be true at a particular point in the code unless there is a flaw in the code logic. They are for catching bugs, not invalid data or runtime errors. If you have a bug then (except in very special circumstances) you no longer have any idea of the integrity of the process or its data, so all you can do is stop. (If you are lucky you can drive outputs into a safe state before you stop.) –  Ian Goldby Feb 13 '13 at 8:34
    
@IanGoldby: yes - I agree, but the question specifically postulates this usage. I didn't want to get dragged into an explanation of the situations in which programmers tend to choose one or the other - just illustrated that the proposed technique wasn't even robust. –  Tony D Feb 13 '13 at 8:44
    
@TonyD: Andrei espoused exceptions for error handling in a presentation he gave on the D Programming Language, that I attended and made notes on: blog.andy.glew.ca/2009/07/… // not specific to Andrei, but Andrei is heavily involved with D, and D says: dlang.org/overview.html Exception handling. More and more experience with exception handling shows it to be a superior way to handle errors than the C traditional method of using error codes and errno globals. // D exceptions are better than C++, but I think C++ is usable. –  Krazy Glew Feb 14 '13 at 20:45
    
@IanGoldby: my preferred usage model for "Out-of-the-Blue" exceptions is to have them exit - but not immediately. Instead, they print an error message, then throw; some outer level prints an error message, then throws; and typically at the outermost level, main, I print a final error message, and exit(1). Basically, I use exceptions as a way of providing more context to the error. // Hmmm... I'll explain that in the question. –  Krazy Glew Feb 14 '13 at 20:48
    
@KrazyGlew even in what you've said above "superior way to handle errors than the C traditional method of using error codes and errno globals" you're not comparing exceptions and assertions, which as I tried to explain in my answer are different sides of a conceptual line between run-time handled issues and a code quality verification mechanism. –  Tony D Aug 23 '13 at 9:47

I wrote an application that runs on an embedded system. In the early days I sprinkled asserts through the code liberally, ostensibly to document conditions in the code that should be impossible (but in a few places as lazy error-checking).

It turned out that the asserts were occasionally being hit, but no one ever got to see the message output to the console containing the file and line number, because the console serial port generally was not connected to anything. I later redefined the assert macro so that instead of outputting a message to the console it would send a message over the network to the error logger.

Whether or not you think redefining assert is 'evil', this works well for us.

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@ Ian Goldby - thanks for reminding me: I have done almost exactly the same thing. In one case, I wrote a database for a PC that was driving several displays in kiosks. The legacy assert() macros from the compiler vendor wrote to the PC primary monitor. Had to change them to record to a log that could be retrieved over a phone line. –  Krazy Glew Feb 13 '13 at 16:03
    
Strange - attempting to write "@ Ian Goldby" without spaces gets elided. –  Krazy Glew Feb 13 '13 at 16:05

If you include any headers/libraries that utilize assert, then you would experience unexpected behavior, otherwise the compiler allows you to do it so you can do it.

My suggestion, which is based on personal opinion is that in any case you can define your own assert without the need to redefine the existing one. You are never gaining extra benefit from redefining the existing one over defining a new one with a new name.

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1  
Just because a compiler swallows certain code does not mean it is legal, standard wise –  PlasmaHH Feb 12 '13 at 20:33
1  
@PlasmaHH I never said it is. Sometimes such redefines have their objective use cases, answering further would get this into a discussion. –  Konstantin D - Infragistics Feb 12 '13 at 20:35

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