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I am working on a compiler that generates "assembler-like" instructions for a stack machine. (More precisely I generate Java bytecode instructions in text form that I can e.g. embed in a file that I can then compile using Jasmin to a java .class file). I do the whole thing solely for educational purposes.

Assume the following java like expression:

a = 1+2

ANTLR will generate a parse tree that should look about like this:

          a=
           |
           |
           +
          / \
         /   \
        1     2

Walking the tree post order gives me "1,2,+,a=" which I transform into:

lcd 1 // push integer 1 on top of stack
lcd 2 // push integer 2 on top of stack
iadd  // remove the top two numbers from stack, perform addition with those numbers, and push the result on stack
istore 0 // pop top element from stack and store it in variable space number zero.

The instructions start with an empty stack and in the end the stack is again... Empty. This is what my compiler can currently do. It generates those instructions by traversing the syntax tree that ANTLR generated for me post order.

Now the problem: Suppose I have the following expression:

a = b = 1+2

or even

callToSomeFunctionWhichReturnsAValue();

In the first expression TWO "istore"-instructions are generated, both trying to pop a value from the stack. The first one will succeed, the second one finds an empty stack and everything goes drown the drain.

The second example on the other hand adds a value to the stack that is never popped. If I happend to do this in a loop I will eventually get a stack overflow (and I am not talking about a Q&A-website here).

The solution of course would be to add "dup" instructions (duplicate the item on top of stack) or "pop" instructions (discard the value on top of stack). But how do I know when and where?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's tough to know exactly what to suggest without seeing some of your grammar. I've made some assumptions here about what you have written which may not be correct. However, I think the problem you're having is general enough to address it as such, even if I don't stick strictly to your issue. If nothing else, I hope that the example provided gets you what you need.


Arithmetic operators are evaluated from left to right. The problem you seem to be having is that the = operator in a = b = 1 + 2 is being evaluated left to right because that's the order the nodes appear in the AST and that's the order you visit them.

But = operand expressions are evaluated from right to left. It's possible to make your tree represent this by changing the node orders. But what I think makes more sense is to alter the tree walker to accommodate the desired evaluation order while preserving the natural order of the input in the AST.

For example, assume your AST appears like so:

      =
     / \
    a   =
       / \
      b   +
         / \
        1   2

Evaluating the operators in the correct order works in the following steps:

  • The tree walker hits the first =. It knows that the right-hand side is evaluated first, so it skips processing a. It continues to the second child, =.
  • It hits the second =. It evaluates the second child (+), skipping b for now.
  • The + is evaluated. Now 3 is on the stack, and it's the only thing on the stack.
  • The pending = logic takes over after the last child (+) has evaluated. dup is called, istore is called for b. 3 is on the stack.
  • The pending = logic takes over after the last child (=) has evaluated. dup is called, istore is called for a. 3 is on the stack.
  • The statement ends, so pop is called. The stack is now empty.

NB: With this process, every statement -- whether it performs an assignment or not -- is expected to end with one and only one value on to the stack. Only the statement's end pops it. Expressions that have no natural value to push, for example a call to void foo(), are still expected to push something, even if it's null, 0, or some reserved void object. It's the job of an early compiler stage to ensure that these expressions are not assigned to.

Below are a short example token parser and a tree parser, along with some test input and output, that demonstrate how this can be done in ANTLR (v3). I used pseudo instructions for simplicity and made no attempt to optimize the output.

Ordered.g

grammar Ordered;

options 
{
    output = AST; 
}

tokens {
 COMPUNIT;
 STAT;
 REFID;
}

compilationUnit : statement* EOF -> ^(COMPUNIT statement*);
statement: assign_expr SEMI -> ^(STAT assign_expr)
         | expr SEMI -> ^(STAT expr)
         ;
assign_expr: ID EQ^ (assign_expr | expr); //call recursively to keep the tree simple.
expr : add_expr;
add_expr : primary_expr (PLUS^ primary_expr)*;
primary_expr 
    : NUM 
    | (ID -> REFID[$ID.text]) //An ID expr is a reference to the thing named in ID. 
    | LPAR! expr RPAR!
    ;

SEMI: ';';
EQ : '=';
LPAR : '(';
RPAR : ')';
PLUS : '+';
ID : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z')+;
NUM: ('0'..'9')+;
WS : (' '|'\t'|'\f'|'\r'|'\n')+ {skip();};

OrderedTreeParser.g

tree grammar OrderedTreeParser;

options { 
    output = AST;
    tokenVocab = Ordered;
    ASTLabelType = CommonTree;
    filter = true;
}

@members {
    private java.util.LinkedList<String> assigningIds = new java.util.LinkedList<String>(); 
}

topdown
    : enter_assign
    ;

enter_assign
    : ^(EQ ID {assigningIds.push($ID.getText());} .+) //Push our ID and handle assignment during bottomup.
    ;   

bottomup 
    : NUM {System.out.println("lcd " + $NUM.getText());}
    | EQ 
        {
            System.out.println("dup");
            System.out.println("istore " + assigningIds.pop());
        }
    | PLUS {System.out.println("iadd");}
    | REFID {System.out.println("iload " + $REFID.getText());}
    | STAT {System.out.println("pop");}
    ; 

OrderedTest.java

import java.io.IOException;
import org.antlr.runtime.ANTLRStringStream;
import org.antlr.runtime.CharStream;
import org.antlr.runtime.CommonTokenStream;
import org.antlr.runtime.RecognitionException;
import org.antlr.runtime.tree.CommonTreeNodeStream;
import org.antlr.runtime.tree.Tree;

public class OrderedTest {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        test("a = 1;");
        test("a = 1 + 2;");
        test("a = b = 1 + 2;");
        test("a = b = 1 + c;");
        test("x = y = z = 1 + 2;");
        test("1 + 2;"); //no assignment
    }

    private static void test(String str) throws RecognitionException, Exception, IOException {
        CharStream input = new ANTLRStringStream(str);
        OrderedLexer lexer = new OrderedLexer(input);
        CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);

        OrderedParser parser = new OrderedParser(tokens);

        OrderedParser.compilationUnit_return result = parser.compilationUnit();

        if (lexer.getNumberOfSyntaxErrors() > 0 || parser.getNumberOfSyntaxErrors() > 0){
            throw new Exception("Syntax Errors encountered!");
        }

        OrderedTreeParser tparser = new OrderedTreeParser(new CommonTreeNodeStream(result.getTree()));
        tparser.downup(result.getTree());
        System.out.println("---------");
    }

}

Test Cases

Input

a = 1;

Output

lcd 1
dup
istore a
pop

Input

a = 1 + 2;

Output

lcd 1
lcd 2
iadd
dup
istore a
pop

Input

a = b = 1 + 2;

Output

lcd 1
lcd 2
iadd
dup
istore b
dup
istore a
pop

Input

a = b = 1 + c;

Output

lcd 1
iload c
iadd
dup
istore b
dup
istore a
pop

Input

x = y = z = 1 + 2;

Output

lcd 1
lcd 2
iadd
dup
istore z
dup
istore y
dup
istore x
pop

Input

1 + 2;

Output

lcd 1
lcd 2
iadd
pop
share|improve this answer
    
That's a quite extensive answer, thx :-). I could transfer the idea to my ANTLRv4 grammar and code without problems. I guess it will be the task of a bytecode optimizer to find an eliminate unneeded dup/pop instructions –  yankee Feb 14 '13 at 13:31
    
@yankee I'm glad I could help. I think optimized output would be relatively easy to produce if you make a separate pass through the AST to add some context to the nodes, like the number of pushes and pops expected by the end of a statement. Then reference that when you make your normal write pass to know if a= is the last pop and if the statement is left with something on the stack. Sounds like a fun problem. ;) –  user1201210 Feb 14 '13 at 15:11

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