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Below I have a rough implementation of testing a list lambda functions on an integer in Python. I know Java currently doesn't support closures or lambdas (yet), but I'm curious, is this remotely possible in Java?

pos = [lambda x : x > 0, "pos"]
even = [lambda x : x % 2 == 0, "even"]
small = [lambda x : x < 100, "small"]

def pass_test(x, tests):
    if (len(tests) == 0): return []
    else:
        if (tests[0][0](x)): return [tests[0][1]] + pass_test(x, tests[1:])
        else: return pass_test(x, tests[1:])
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5  
The closest thing is really an anonymous implementation of an interface or abstract class. –  LaceCard Feb 12 '13 at 21:23
    
Are you simply looking how you would write the code in Java using methods in place of lamda functions? –  JustinKSU Feb 12 '13 at 21:25
    
As @bowenl2 said, you would need smth like: public interface Function { String do(int x); } And then you can create lots of anonymous inner classes for each function instance. –  Ostap Andrusiv Feb 12 '13 at 21:25
    
There should be lambdas (concise anonymous inner classes) in Java SE 8. Although it'll still be a nominative typed language, so you'll still need to declare a type. / Enums give a merely semi-verbose way of implementing the same type in a number of stateless ways. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 12 '13 at 21:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, it is possible, along the lines of:

interface Predicate<A> {
    boolean eval(A argument);
}

Predicate<Integer> gt0 = new Predicate<Integer>() {
    boolean eval(Integer arg) {
        return arg > 0;
    }
};

You see, this is a bit verbose, but it does the job.

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In your case, python function could be mapped to Java like this:

public interface Function { 
    String do(int x); 
}

// ...
Function pos = new Function(){
    public String do(int x) {
        return (x > 0) ? "pos" : "";
    }
}
Function even = new Function(){
    public String do(int x) {
        return (x % 2 == 0) ? "even" : "";
    }
}
Function small = new Function(){
    public String do(int x) {
        return (x < 100) ? "small" : "";
    }
}

// ...

As you see, you'd need a lot more code to do the same simple thing in Java.

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