Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code to write to the Windows command console:

use Win32::Console;
my $console = new Win32::Console(Win32::Console::STD_ERROR_HANDLE());
my $defaultAttribute = $console->Attr();
my $defaultFG = ($defaultAttribute & 0x0F);
my $defaultBG = ($defaultAttribute & 0xF0);
$console->Attr($defaultBG | $Win32::Console::FG_LIGHTGREEN);
$console->Write("blah blah");
$console->Attr($defaultAttribute);

This code fails if the user redirects STDERR when invoking my script:

perl myscript.pl 2> foo

How can I obtain a handle to the Win32 console the process is attached to without reference to one of the standard handles so that it doesn't matter what redirections the user makes?

The effect I want is to be able to write a message on the console immediately following normal program output regardless of any redirection in a similar way to the bash builtin time command. Essentially, similar to opening and writing to /dev/tty in Unix.

I've tried my $console = new Win32::Console() to allocate a new console followed by $console->Display() but this does completely the wrong thing.

share|improve this question
    
There usually is a good reason to say 2>blubb. I hate it when programs demand attention when I told them to be silent. –  Ingo Feb 12 '13 at 22:12
    
@Ingo: Fair point but I'm not going to modify the requirements for a program I write for myself to suit you. :-) –  Adrian Pronk Feb 12 '13 at 22:18
    
You made my day! You mean, just in case you accidentaly type 2>NUL .... –  Ingo Feb 12 '13 at 22:30
    
@Ingo: No. My command is like bash's time and I want to use it like: cd this && mytime mvn ... >> ..\x 2>&1 && cd ..\that && mytime mvn ... >> ..\x 2>&1 with compile output in x and timings on screen. Plus it fills in what seemed to me to be a gap between what Win32::Console allows and what is possible with the Windows API. –  Adrian Pronk Feb 12 '13 at 22:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After asking this question, I delved a bit deeper and was able to solve it by using a nasty hack:

use Win32API::File qw(createFile);
use Win32::Console;

my $handle = createFile('CONOUT$', 'rwke') or die "conout\$: $^E\n";
# my $console = new Win32::Console($handle) or die "new console: $^E\n";
my $console = bless {handle => $handle}, 'Win32::Console';

I looked at the code for the new() function inside Win32::Console and saw that it just creates a hash containing the handle to a console. If the parameter specifies stdin/stdout/stderr, it just retrieves the associated handle otherwise it creates a new console screen buffer and uses the handle for that.

So I just manually created the Win32::Console object containing a handle to the console returned by CreateFile.

So now perl myscript.pl > nul 2> nul < nul will write blah blah on the screen immediately below the command line.

I'll accept a better answer if someone comes up with one.

share|improve this answer

According to the AllocConsole() docs (C++ docs, but the concepts are the same):

"A process can be associated with only one console, so the AllocConsole function fails if the calling process already has a console. A process can use the FreeConsole function to detach itself from its current console, then it can call AllocConsole to create a new console or AttachConsole to attach to another console."

Since your console is already redirected it doesn't look like there's anything you can do about it; even if you detach the console and allocate a new one, the new console inherits the redirection. In C++ you would use the SetStdHandle() API to force the standard handles to point to a different file or device, but I can't find any Perl equivalent of that.

share|improve this answer
    
Redirecting the standard handles does not free the console. CreateFile('conout$') will retrieve the handle to the allocated console but there's no direct way of using this in Perl's Win32::Console module. –  Adrian Pronk Feb 12 '13 at 22:05
    
Failing to see where I said that redirecting would free the console... In any case your comment about having no direct way to change it was my point. Also I would expect CreateFile on conout$ to also get you a handle to the redirected output. –  HerrJoebob Feb 12 '13 at 22:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.