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select a
from t
where b = 1 and c = 2 
  1. To improve the performance of this query, should I create index (b, c) and index(c, b) or is the first index sufficient?
  2. From what I understand, index (b, c, a) might improve performance further, but only if (b, c, a) is MORE unique than (b, c). Is that correct?
  3. Do SQL questions belong to dba.stackexchange site?
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Which RDBMS are you using? –  Adam Wenger Feb 12 '13 at 21:46
    
I'm using Oracle if that's what you're asking. –  Nathan Spears Feb 12 '13 at 22:33
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. You only need one index on both columns. Which of the two is better depends on the structure of the table and queries that will use it, but there isn't usually a significant difference from the order of composite indexes.

  2. An index on that covers all of the columns used in a query is called a covering index. It can improve performance, but unless the table has a lot of columns or is very large, it usually won't make a significant difference. The reason it can be faster is that instead of having to go to the data after finding the entries in an index, it can just use the index and not need to look at the data since everything it needs is in the index.

  3. Some questions are better suited for dba, but this one is fine here. This may have even been migrated over here since it isn't very technical.

For the first two parts, the general idea is that "it depends". In your situation, it probably won't make a significant difference which way you go since you probably aren't working with a significant amount of data; you'd probably need at least 10 MB of data in a table for there to be a noticeable difference.

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1.To improve the performance of this query, should I create index (b, c) and index(c, b) or is the first index sufficient?

You don't need to create both indexes. Any of the two, if it is used for the execution of the query may improve efficiency equally for this type of query (that has a where b = 1 and c = 2 condition). Whether it is used or not and whether it improves performance or not, depends on the selectivity of the index.

2.From what I understand, index (b, c, a) might improve performance further, but only if (b, c, a) is MORE unique than (b, c). Is that correct?

Yes. An index on (b , c, a) (or one on (c, b, a) equally well) will improve performance. Independent of selectivity or not. Reading an index (and all from the same location in the index) cannot be worse than reading from (the (b, c) index and then getting the a column data from one row here and another there from a (probably much wider) table.

The selectivity of (b, c), e.g. how many rows the query returns, will affect how much improvement on efficiency, the (b, c, a) index will give you. If the query returns a few dozen rows, the difference will be small. If the query returns thousands of rows among millions of the table, the improvement will be high as all the data will be read from the (covering) index.

3.Do SQL questions belong to dba.stackexchange site?

That is a question for the meta sites, either the main one or the DBA.SE meta.

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