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I am trying to generate 5 seconds of sine wave sound with frequency 1000. I have written the following code

int sampleRate = 44100;
int freqOfTone = 1000;
AudioTrack track;
// 5 seconds
short samples = new short[sampleRate*5];
track = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC,
         sampleRate, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_CONFIGURATION_MONO,
                                      AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, samples.length,

double angle = 0;
double increment = (2 * Math.PI * freqOfTone / sampleRate); // angular increment 

for (int i = 0; i < samples.length-1; i++) {
          samples[i] =   (short) (Math.sin(angle) * Short.MAX_VALUE);
          angle += increment;
track.write(samples, 0, samples.length); // write data to audio hardware; 

The sound wave length is only 2.5 seconds and I think it should be 5 seconds. Why?

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3 Answers 3

See the reference.

The 5th argument of AudioTrack constructor is "bufferSizeInBytes".

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This is the answer, change the fifth argument from samples.length to samples.length * Short.SIZE / Byte.SIZE. –  Yimin Rong Feb 17 '13 at 13:07

Is; synchronous or asynchronous? If the latter, you may be ending the program and shutting it down before it gets a chance to finish. You can try a "press any key" or other pause at the end to confirm.

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I am using the static mode not the stream mode. Also, I tried it inside a button and I still have the same problem. If I put the samples 10*sampleRate, I get 5 seconds. So it is always divided by 2. –  yasserbn Feb 12 '13 at 22:31

This seems to be the correct behavior because you specified a ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, if you change it to ENCODING_PCM_8BIT you will get 5 seconds of play.

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But I am storing the samples in 16-bit register (short) not in 8-bit (byte). Anyway, I need to stay on Encoding_PCM_16BIT, how can I get 5 seconds? –  yasserbn Feb 13 '13 at 9:33
You already know the answer, multiply sampleRate by 10 instead of 5 –  iTech Feb 13 '13 at 9:35
That's the question; Why should I multiply by 2. Also, when I did that (sampleRate*10), the frequency of the sound will be 2000hz instead of 1000hz. I need it to be 5sec with 1000hz. –  yasserbn Feb 13 '13 at 12:25
This doesn't make sense, assume you wanted to generate 10 seconds with frequency 1000. Using your code it was going to be 1000 * 10 which exactly equal to 2000 * 5 so is it 5 seconds with frequency 2000 or 10 seconds with frequency 1000 !? –  iTech Feb 13 '13 at 18:05
As a conclusion. What should the numberofsamples be to have 5 sec, 1000 hz, 16bit_encoding? You can try the code quickly. –  yasserbn Feb 13 '13 at 20:32

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