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Im working with Body Mass Index and im wonder why my "range" system is only setting a label to one value. Is there a better way to set this up that will work much better?

   int bmiInt = currentBMI;
if ( 0<=bmiInt <= 18.5) {
    weightStatus.text = @"Status: Underweight";
}
if (18.6 <= bmiInt <= 24.9) {
    weightStatus.text = @"Status: Normal weight";
}
if (25 <= bmiInt <= 29.9) {
    weightStatus.text = @"Status: Overweight";
}
if (bmiInt >= 30) {
    weightStatus.text = @"Status: Obese";
}

For some reason weightStatus.text is always equal to @"Status Overweight" even if bmiInt is not inside that range. Why?

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1  
never written xcode, but most languages don't allow chaining operators like that.. shouldn't it be if ((0 <= bmiInt) && (bmiInt <= 18.5))? –  Marc B Feb 12 '13 at 22:14
    
Thank you! Worked perfectly! –  Matt Donkey Feb 12 '13 at 22:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

0 <= bmiInt <= 18.5 doesn't do what you think it does. The return value of a comparison operator is either 0 or 1, denoting true and false. This expression can be rewritten as (0 <= bmiInt) <= 18.5, which means that after evaluating the first comparison 0 <= bmiInt, you're going to end up with 0 <= 18.5 or 1 <= 18.5, which both evaluate to 1, which passes the conditional.

This is going to be true for your first 3 conditionals, which means that unless bmiInt >= 30 evaluates to true, then your label is always going to show @"Status: Overweight".

You want to rewrite this like

if (0 <= bmiInt && bmiInt <= 18.5) {
    ...
}
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