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Let's say I have this code:

models.py :

class Square:
  def __init__(self, name, value):
    self._name = name
    self._value = value

mymodule.py :

from models import Square
Square('hello', 'there')

main.py

m = __import__('mymodule')
for i in dir(m):
  if i == 'Square':
     models.append(getattr(m, i))

My question is: how do I instantiate the Square I appended (with the arguments I gave in mymodule.py, of course)?

The idea is to instantiate the Square later.

Thanks!

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Where did models in main.py come from? –  martineau Feb 12 '13 at 22:48
    
@martineau Just some python list. –  user1491915 Feb 12 '13 at 22:59
    
OK, it was confusing because of the from models... you have in mymodule.py and there was no definition for it anywhere in your main.py. –  martineau Feb 12 '13 at 23:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a flaw in your mymodule.py file; you never store the instance. Store it in a variable:

somevariable = Square('hello', 'there')

You cannot just call the constructor and let it dangle.

Looping over the attributes of mymodule looking for something named Square is not going to get what you want, you'll find the class reference, not the instance.

Perhaps you should be looking for objects of the Square type instead:

from models import Square

for value in vars(m).itervalues():
    if isinstance(value, Square):
         models.append(value)

If you want to avoid having to import the Square class, you'd have to test for the type name instead, which is more fragile:

for value in vars(m).itervalues():
    if getattr(type(value), '__name__', None) == 'Square':
         models.append(value)

If you want to really postpone construction, instead construct it later with a set of pre-set values, use functools.partial():

from models import Square
from functools import partial

somevariable = partial(Square, 'hello', 'there')

If you now import somevariable and call it, the partial will apply the arguments already passed in and create the instance:

instance = somevariable()  # calls Square('hello', 'there')
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that just reference the class though? I would be interested in instantiating it with the arguments I gave initially. –  user1491915 Feb 12 '13 at 22:59
    
Where do name and value come from though? I want to use the 'hello' and 'there' that I passed in mymodule.py (that specific call). –  user1491915 Feb 12 '13 at 23:02
    
Sorry, I misread your question; rereading led to a different answer.. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 12 '13 at 23:04
    
Right, but that would instantiate the Square right there, which I don't want. I want to instantiate it later. –  user1491915 Feb 12 '13 at 23:06
    
Further expanded. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 12 '13 at 23:08

Actually you are instantiating it in mymodule.py, but it gets discarded. To stop that you need to store the Square created there in something with a name, otherwise it will be garbage-collected since nothing refers to it. Here's what I mean:

mymodule.py :

from models import Square
a_square = Square('hello', 'there') # name it

Then you can access it directly and more quickly using that name in main.py like this:

main.py

models = []
mod = __import__('mymodule')
models.append(vars(mod)['a_square'])  # access it by name
share|improve this answer

"The idea is to instantiate the Square later."

You can do that by storing the callable and its arguments.

import models
# save as (callable, args, keywords). This does not create a Square
my_model = (model.Squares, ('hello', 'there'), {})
# sometime later, create the square
my_square = my_model[0](*my_model[1], **my_model[2])

Or if you want to get super fancy and generate a lot of models, you can make a list:

models.py:

class Square(object):
  def __init__(self, name, value):
    self._name = name
    self._value = value

class Round(object):
  def __init__(self, name, value, otherstuff=None):
    self._name = name
    self._value = value
    self._otherstuff = otherstuff

mymodule.py:

import models
my_models = (
  (models.Square, ('hello', 'there'), {}),
  (models.Round, ('goodbye', 'there'), {'otherstuff':'stuff'})
)

main.py

m = __import__('mymodule')
models = [model[0](*model[1], **model[2]) for model in m.my_models]
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