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var http = require('http');

var options = {
    method: 'GET',
    host: 'www.google.com',
    port: 80,
    path: '/index.html'
};

http.request(
    options,
    function(err, resBody){
        console.log("hey");
        console.log(resBody);
        if (err) {
            console.log("YOYO");
            return;
        }
    }
);

For some reason this just times out and doesn't log anything to the console.

I'm aware that I could require('request') but I need to use http to be compatible with a plugin I'm using.

Also, background on my versions: Node is v0.8.2

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the example here: http://nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_http_request_options_callback

var options = {
  hostname: 'www.google.com',
  port: 80,
  path: '/upload',
  method: 'POST'
};

var req = http.request(options, function(res) {
  console.log('STATUS: ' + res.statusCode);
  console.log('HEADERS: ' + JSON.stringify(res.headers));
  res.setEncoding('utf8');
  res.on('data', function (chunk) {
    console.log('BODY: ' + chunk);
  });
});

req.on('error', function(e) {
  console.log('problem with request: ' + e.message);
});

// write data to request body
req.write('data\n');
req.write('data\n');
req.end();

the callback does not have an error parameter, you should use on("error", ...) and your request doesn't get sent till you call end()

share|improve this answer
    
your request doesn't get sent till you call end() Not true, it just doesn't end the request until then. Try writing to the request, without ending and watching ngrep. The request is sent and data is written to the request over time, the TCP session just isn't closed until .end() is called. The reason his doesn't do anything is because nothing is written to the request, and it isn't ended so node is waiting to know what to send. –  Chad Feb 12 '13 at 22:52
    
indeed, you are correct. But the server will will wait to reply till you call end(), or it times out. –  Pascal Belloncle Feb 12 '13 at 22:54
1  
Depends on the response type, try doing a write with no end with his exact code and watch what happens on ngrep. Google responds immediately because that URL doesn't exist, and your app will get/parse the error response then exit. All without you ever calling end. I tried it out and watched it happen because I was skeptical of the assumption. I think it is due to 'GET" not having a body, so if you hit a write they figure you are done. –  Chad Feb 13 '13 at 1:47
    
yes, there are a lot of variables at play here. –  Pascal Belloncle Feb 13 '13 at 1:48
    
in fact, thinking about it some more, very interesting data point. Thank you for doing the experiment! –  Pascal Belloncle Feb 13 '13 at 2:08

You prepared a request object, but didn't fire it with .end(). (Also the callback doesn't work that way.)

See: http://nodejs.org/api/http.html#http_event_request

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Couple things here:

  • Use hostname not host so you are compatible with url.parse() (see here)
  • The callback for request takes one argument which is an http.ClientResponse
  • To catch an error use req.on('error', ...)
  • When using http.request you need to end the request when you are done req.end() this is so you can write any body you need to (with req.write()) before ending the request
    • Note: http.get() will do this for you under the hood, which may be why you forgot.

Working code:

var http = require('http');

var options = {
    method: 'GET',
    hostname: 'www.google.com',
    port: 80,
    path: '/index.html'
};

var req = http.request(
    options,
    function(res){
        console.log("hey");
        console.log(res);
    }
);

req.on('error', function(err) {
  console.log('problem', err);
});

req.end();
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