Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am facing a undefined local variable or method error when initializing the following in ruby:

 class Model
  attr_accessor :var1, :var2, :state
  def initialize (x, y, key)
    @var1 = x
    @var2 = y
    @state = every_state[:key] #this line produces the error

  @every_state = {
  :A => SateA.new,
  :B => StateB.new,
  :C => StateC.new,
  :D => StateD.new
  }       
  end

  def select_state(key)
    every_state[:key]
  end
end

When I am using the class like

model = Model.new(1,2,:A)

The error occurs: *undefined local variable or method `every_state'*

As I am new to ruby coming from a java background, I wanted to pass a key to the initialize method (as noted here), to select a specific initial state from the hash.

Could it be that I am using the hash in a wrong way, or should I take it out of the initialize method completely and use another method to set it? My other thought is that I am using the symbol for key incorrectly.

Also, is there a direct implication of operating on non-instance variables within the initialize method? For example I was wondering what is the purpose of declaring the hash as an instance variable within initialize...

Any ideas are very welcome.

share|improve this question
    
Your indentation is wrong - @every_state is defined in #initialize, and thus should be indented at the same level. Also, you should initialize @every_state before using it - move the initialization before the call (@state = ...) –  hrnt Sep 27 '09 at 20:27
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe this implementation is the closest one to the Java one.

class Model
  attr_accessor :var1, :var2, :state

  def initialize (x, y, key)
    @var1 = x
    @var2 = y
    @every_state = {
      :A => SataeA.new,
      :B => StateB.new,
      :C => StateC.new,
      :D => StateD.new
    }   
    @state = select_state key 
  end

  def select_state(key)
    @every_state[key]
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
That works, thanks for the help. However I am still wondering about ennuikiller's remark: How can I avoid redefining the hash with every call to Model.new ? –  denchr Sep 27 '09 at 20:57
    
Note that the latter version is different than the original Java version. The latter version shares the states with all instances (If you modify State A in instance X, it also gets modifies that state A of instance Y). –  hrnt Sep 27 '09 at 21:37
    
So, now that the hash is defined as a constant, it is shared among all instances of Model. Each model carries the entire hash and also has an instance variable @state. @state selectively takes a value from the hash depending on the business logic. This should vary between different model objects, right? If the original constant hash with the states change, then the change will propagate to all model objects, right? So by saying "shares the states with all instances" you mean shares the hash which is now a constant across all models? -- but not the value of the @state in each of them. –  denchr Sep 27 '09 at 21:51
    
Thanks, but I am still a bit confused: we modify the @state variable by taking any value from the States hash right? Is that what you mean? The way I understand it is that @state is instance-specific, but the States hash, which is now a constant, is tied to the class, thus shared among all instances. I hope this is correct. Perhaps I should read up on the clone method.. –  denchr Sep 27 '09 at 21:54
    
I really appreciate the explanation. The idea was for a Model to store its available states in a hash structure. All subsequent model objects should share the same available states. @state is a variable which references an object from the available states hash based on some business logic. Each state object in the hash has actions which may or may not change the @state of that particular instance. So @state is instance specific, but the hash structure, which can be defined as a constant, is tied to the class? -- Still some confusion.. Sorry about all the questions. –  denchr Sep 27 '09 at 22:25
show 5 more comments

You don't have a function called "every_state". You only have a instance variable @every_state. That is why you get an error.

Replace all calls to every_state with @every_state. You don't have a function or a local variable every_state. You only have a instance variable @every_state.

share|improve this answer
add comment

you have a typo: :A => SateA.new should be :A => StateA.new. Also I would put the hash definition at the top level outside of the initialize method otherwise you'll be redefining it with every call to new which is definite;y NOT want you want to do!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the hint, however would you mind explaining a little further. I put the has definition outside of the initialize in a separate method: def getStates available_states = { :A => SataeA.new, :B => StateB.new, :C => StateC.new, :D => StateD.new } end Wouldn't that still redifine the hash members each time? Thanks –  denchr Sep 27 '09 at 20:45
    
You are still spelling state wrong, SataeA needs to be StateA. –  Garrett Sep 27 '09 at 21:31
    
fixed that. Thanks –  denchr Sep 27 '09 at 21:42
    
I believe he wants to maintain a set of states for each individual instance, that's why i think the hash definition is ok as it's now. –  khelll Sep 27 '09 at 22:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.