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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int get_num(int num);
void read_num(int num);

int main()
{
  int num;
  do
  {
    get_num(num);
    if(num == 1)
      read_num(num);

   }while(num != 0);
 }

 int get_num(int num)
 {
   printf("Please enter an integer from 0 and 2\n");
   scanf("%d", &num);
   if (num == 1)
     return num;
 }

 void read_num(int num);
 {
   printf("Hello.\n");
 }

When the user enters 1, the read_num function never gets called? I don't understand why? I thought return num; returns what num back to main. And if num == 0, the program terminates, and if num == 1, then the read_num function should be called.

share|improve this question
1  
Yes, it returns back to main, but you never use the return value. Your scanf call is only modifying the argument version of num, not the one main has. –  zneak Feb 12 '13 at 23:01
    
I see. So how can I call function read_num when the user enters 1? How do I pass the integer "1" back to main? –  James Feb 12 '13 at 23:05
1  
num =get_num(num), or use a pointer for num. learn how to pass value by reference or by value –  Gilad Feb 12 '13 at 23:06

2 Answers 2

There is quite a lot wrong with your code: main() and getNum() are both declared as returning an int, yet main() never returns anything and getNum() returns only if the user enters 1. If you have a function returning anything other than void, make sure that every possible control flow has an appropriate return statement.

Then there is the issue with call by value vs call by reference. You should really look that up, because this is not the right place to explain and many people have written about better than I can.

read_num(num); num is undefined here, you might understand that better once you know how C passes parameters.

The same goes for returning values. Functions in C return values (declared by the return type as in int get_num(). When you call a function like that you can assign the return value to a variable. In main you could write int number = get_num()

Your code could look a little bit like that, but I'm not sure if that's what you really want it to do:

int main()
{
    int num;
    do {
        num = get_num();
        if(num == 1) {
            printf("%d\n", num);
        }   
    } while(num != 0);
    return 0;
}

int get_num(int num)
{
    printf("Please enter an integer from 0 and 2\n");
    scanf("%d", &num);
    if (num == 1)
        return num;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

C uses pass by value not pass by reference, as such your are just working with a COPY of the value stored in the variable "num" of your main function, when you enter get_num. Manipulation the value of the variable "num" in get_num won't do any change to the value of the variable "num" in your main function.

To use the "calculated" value in your main function you have to assign the return value of your get_num function to the variable "num" in your main function. Just replace the line

get_num(num);

with

num = get_num(num);

and everything should be fine.

EDIT: To return more than one value you would have to pass pointers to the desired storage location of the return values to a function. As an example here a variation of your program using a pointer instead.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int get_num(int num);
void read_num(int num);

int main()
{
  int num = 0; /* better give it a defined value here */
  int n_args_read;
  do
  {
    n_args_read = get_num(&num);
    if(n_args_read == 1)
      read_num(num);

   }while(num != 0);
 }

 int get_num(int *num)
 {
   printf("Please enter an integer from 0 and 2\n");
   return scanf("%d", num);
 }

 void read_num(int num);
 {
   printf("Hello.\n");
 }
share|improve this answer
3  
"and everything should be fine." - except when he doesn't enter 1. –  Matt Feb 12 '13 at 23:13
    
Thanks! What if I want to return two values back to main? If the user enters 1, the function read_num is called. If the user enters 2, then the function write_num is called. In this case I have to return two values back to main, do I have to use a pointer if I want to return two values? –  James Feb 12 '13 at 23:16

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