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After learning some Scala and the benefits of FP, I am reimplementing some of my previous CS assignments to better understand FP. However, I got to one assignment that seems impractical to implement with FP (or at least trivially translate).

When solving a simple 2D maze it is necessary to remember which nodes have been visited. However, without shared state, how can each recursive call know what nodes the other recursive calls have examined? I could pass the maze as a parameter to each recursive call and return a new maze containing the places visited, but that seems too computationally intensive to copy an entire maze each recursive call. Would a more advanced approach be required to implement an immutable maze solver?

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could this help at all? -- cdsmith.wordpress.com/2011/06/06/mazes-in-haskell-my-version –  גלעד ברקן Feb 13 '13 at 5:53
    
no it's not computationally intensive because what gets passed around is only a pointer to that structure; and when you update the structure all the other parts of it are shared (see "persistent immutable data"); and yes it is how you do it without mutation. –  Will Ness Feb 14 '13 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can pass around a set containing the visited nodes (or their ids/names if nodes themselves are comparable for equality in your setup). Adding items to an immutable set generally takes O(log n), so does checking whether an element is contained in the set. So that's significantly cheaper than copying the maze.

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Just to clarify further, the reason that this works is because of sharing: you're not copying the set/the maze, only as much as is needed to insert that one element. Sharing only works thanks to immutability, otherwise mutating the shared portion would cause "spooky action at a distance." –  Antal S-Z Feb 12 '13 at 23:06

Perhaps you noticed that my earlier answer was deleted. Although I was poking fun, by suggesting only that the "computer display in red all the dead-ends and in green the path that connects the entrance to the exit," at the same time, it was a metaphor for what I understand of the functional paradigm - a kind of encompassing precomputed certainty. Given my limited understanding and knowledge, I worked on an example in Haskell that avoids a recursive depth search, computing paths for a 4x5 maze, given an array where each cell in the maze (i.e., each array element) contains only the indexes of the cells it can connect to; and -1 for the entrance, -2 for the exit. (You can see an outline of the maze at the top of the code section.) I know, more experienced programmers could do much more and better. Please let me know if this seems to fit in with the spirit of this question (and thank you, Andrew, for the interesting challenge/direction).

                                  {-M A Z E-}
[E]=[ ]=[ ]=[ ] 
     |
[ ]=[ ]=[ ]=[ ]
     |       |
[ ] [ ]=[ ] [ ]
 |   |       |
[ ] [ ]=[ ]=[ ]
 |   |
[ ]=[ ]=[ ]=[E]

import Data.List
import Data.Maybe

--Each element in the maze lists the indexes of connected cells, '-1' for entrance, '-2' for exit
maze = [[-1,1],  [0,2,5],     [1,3],   [2],
        [5],     [4,6,1,9],   [5,7],   [6,11],
        [12],    [5,13,10],   [9],     [7,15],
        [8,16],  [14,9,17],   [13,15], [14,11],
        [12,17], [13,16,18],  [17,19], [18,-2]]

maze' = [[-1,1],  [0,2],    [1,3],   [2,7],
         [8,5],   [4,6],    [5,7],   [3,6],
         [4,9],   [8,10],   [9,11],  [10,15],
         [16,13], [12,14],  [13,15], [11,14],
         [12,17], [16,18],  [17,19], [18,-2]]

index a = fromJust $ elemIndex a maze
indexes a = map (index) a
areConnected index_a index_b = elem index_a (maze !! index_b)

isStart a  --(a :: cell)
  | elem (-1) a = True
  | otherwise   = False

isEnd a  --(a :: cell)
  | elem (-2) a = True
  | otherwise   = False

hasStart a   --(a :: [cell])
  | isStart (head a) = True
  | otherwise    = False

hasEnd a   --(a :: [cell])
  | isEnd (last a) = True
  | otherwise    = False

isSequenced (w:x:xs) (y:z:zs) --includes possibility of overlap since we do not know how many cells comprise the solution
  | areConnected (index $ last xs) (index y)
    || last xs == y
    || let (b:c:cs) = reverse (w:x:xs) in [c,b] == [y,z] = True
  | otherwise                                            = False

removeBacktracks (x:xs)
  | (x:xs) == []                                     = []
  | xs == []                                         = [x]
  | x == head xs                                     = removeBacktracks xs
  | length xs > 1 && x == let (y:ys) = xs in head ys = removeBacktracks (tail xs)
  | otherwise                                        = x : removeBacktracks xs

--list dead ends
dead_ends = filter (\x -> length x==1 && find (==(-1)) x == Nothing) maze
dead_ends_indexes = map (index) dead_ends

connectedToDeadEnd (x:xs)
  | x `elem` dead_ends_indexes                   = True
  | not (x `elem` dead_ends_indexes) && xs == [] = False
  | otherwise                                    = connectedToDeadEnd xs

--list first from dead ends
first_from_dead_ends = filter (\x -> length x==2 && find (==(-1)) x == Nothing && connectedToDeadEnd x) maze

--create sequences
filtered = [l | l <- maze, not (elem l dead_ends) && not (elem l first_from_dead_ends)]
sequences_3 = [[a,b,c] | a <- filtered, not (isEnd a),
                         b <- filtered, not (isEnd b || isStart b), areConnected (index a) (index b),
                         c <- filtered, not (isStart c), a /= c, areConnected (index b) (index c)]

sequences_4 = [a ++ [b] | a <- sequences_3, not (hasEnd a), b <- filtered,
                          last a /= b, areConnected (index $last a) (index b)]

paths = take 1 [indexes $ concat [a, b, c, d, e] | a <- sequences, hasStart a,
                                                   b <- sequences, not (hasStart b || hasEnd b),
                                                   isSequenced a b,
                                                   c <- sequences, b /= c, not (hasStart c || hasEnd c),
                                                   isSequenced b c,
                                                   d <- sequences, c /= d, not (hasStart d || hasEnd d),
                                                   isSequenced c d,
                                                   e <- sequences, hasEnd e,
                                                   isSequenced d e]
                                                 where sequences 
                                                         | length filtered < 16 = sequences_3
                                                         | otherwise            = sequences_4

path = removeBacktracks $ head paths
main = print path
--outputs: [0,1,5,9,13,17,18,19]
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9th should be [5,13,10] (although inconsequential). –  Will Ness Feb 14 '13 at 15:51

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