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It's trivial to write a function to determine the min/max value in an array, such as:

/**
 * 
 * @param chars
 * @return the max value in the array of chars
 */
private static int maxValue(char[] chars) {
	int max = chars[0];
	for (int ktr = 0; ktr < chars.length; ktr++) {
		if (chars[ktr] > max) {
			max = chars[ktr];
		}
	}
	return max;
}

but isn't this already done somewhere?

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2  
Array of primitive to array of containers would help: stackoverflow.com/questions/3770289/… followed by Collections.max(Arrays.asList()). – Ciro Santilli 巴拿馬文件 六四事件 法轮功 Mar 13 '15 at 7:39

12 Answers 12

up vote 91 down vote accepted

Using Commons Lang (to convert) + Collections (to min/max)

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;

import org.apache.commons.lang.ArrayUtils;

public class MinMaxValue {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        char[] a = {'3', '5', '1', '4', '2'};

        List b = Arrays.asList(ArrayUtils.toObject(a));

        System.out.println(Collections.min(b));
        System.out.println(Collections.max(b));
   }
}

Note that Arrays.asList() wraps the underlying array, so it should not be too memory intensive and it should not perform a copy on the elements of the array.

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1  
what is ArrayUtils – Basheer AL-MOMANI May 18 at 18:39

The Google Guava library has min and max methods in its Chars, Ints, Longs, etc. classes.

So you can simply use:

Chars.min(myarray)

No conversions are required and presumably it's efficiently implemented.

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3  
It's implemented more or less like in the question except it throws an IllegalArgumentException for an array of length 0. (code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/source/browse/trunk/src/com/…) – ColinD Dec 10 '09 at 20:45
3  
This is the best solution of everything here. Avoids all that java.util.Arrays#asList varargs confusion. – Kong May 25 '14 at 23:02
    
Neat and useful, better than anything listed here – Ivan Fazaniuk Jan 6 at 22:28

Yes, it's done in the Collections class. Note that you will need to convert your primitive char array to a Character[] manually.

A short demo:

import java.util.*;

public class Main {

    public static Character[] convert(char[] chars) {
        Character[] copy = new Character[chars.length];
        for(int i = 0; i < copy.length; i++) {
            copy[i] = Character.valueOf(chars[i]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        char[] a = {'3', '5', '1', '4', '2'};
        Character[] b = convert(a);
        System.out.println(Collections.max(Arrays.asList(b)));
    }
}
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can you show me the code to do that? – Nick Heiner Sep 27 '09 at 20:18
1  
Collections.min(myCollection); If you want to use it for arrays, you can do it like Collections.min(Arrays.asList(myArray)); – Zed Sep 27 '09 at 20:33
1  
converting a char [] to a Character [] only to determine the maximum is quite inefficient - better create a utility class with static methods for each primitive type similar to java.util.Arrays: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html – Christoph Sep 27 '09 at 20:33
    
@Christoph: yes, if the size of the array is large, I would agree. Simply stating it is "inefficient" does not make sense if the application in question makes many database calls and/or I/O operations and the size of the array is (relative) small. – Bart Kiers Sep 27 '09 at 20:41
    
you should use Character.valueOf(chars[i]) instead of new Character(chars[i]) for performance reasons: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/… – Christoph Sep 27 '09 at 20:45
import java.util.Arrays;

public class apples {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    int a[] = {2,5,3,7,8};
    Arrays.sort(a);

     int min =a[0];
    System.out.println(min);
    int max= a[a.length-1];
    System.out.println(max);

  }

}
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4  
Please provide some explanation. – Mike Stockdale Apr 19 '14 at 14:47
2  
I think what this means to say is that if you sort the array (in ascending order), by definition, the minimum value will always be at the first position, a[0], and the maximum value will always be at the last position, [a.length-1]. – Jeff Aug 27 '14 at 21:20
    
This is a legitimate and useful way of solving the problem. What's the disadvantage of using it compared to the other ones? – Alex Nov 3 '14 at 19:34
2  
@alex time complexity - sorting is at best an O(nlogn) affair, while Michael Rutherfurd approach is O(n). – jajdoo Jan 10 '15 at 13:34
1  
We dont need sort as single iteration over list is enough to find min and max. – i_am_zero Feb 23 '15 at 5:59

You can simply use the new Java 8 Streams but you have to work with int.

The stream method of the utility class Arrays gives you an IntStream on which you can use the min method. You can also do max, sum, average,...

The getAsInt method is used to get the value frome the OptionalInt

import java.util.Arrays;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        int[] tab = {12, 1, 21, 8};
        int min = Arrays.stream(tab).min().getAsInt();
        int max = Arrays.stream(tab).max().getAsInt();
        System.out.println("Min = " + min);
        System.out.println("Max = " + max)
    }

}

==UPDATE==

If execution time is important and you want to go through the data only once you can use the summaryStatistics() method like this

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.IntSummaryStatistics;

public class SOTest {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        int[] tab = {12, 1, 21, 8};
        IntSummaryStatistics stat = Arrays.stream(tab).summaryStatistics();
        int min = stat.getMin();
        int max = stat.getMax();
        System.out.println("Min = " + min);
        System.out.println("Max = " + max);
    }
}
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1  
@Teepeemm I've modified my answer to take your remark into account. – Ortomala Lokni Jun 21 '15 at 20:53
import java.util.Random;

public class Main {

public static void main(String[] args) {
   int a[] = new int [100];
   Random rnd = new Random ();

    for (int i = 0; i< a.length; i++) {
        a[i] = rnd.nextInt(99-0)+0;
        System.out.println(a[i]);
    }

    int max = 0;          

    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        a[i] = max;


        for (int j = i+1; j<a.length; j++) {
            if (a[j] > max) {
               max = a[j];
            }

        }
    }

    System.out.println("Max element: " + max);
}
}
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Here's a utility class providing min/max methods for primitive types: Primitives.java

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Pass the array to a method that sorts it with Arrays.sort() so it only sorts the array the method is using then sets min to array[0] and max to array[array.length-1].

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The basic way to get the min/max value of an Array. If you need the unsorted array, you may create a copy or pass it to a method that returns the min or max. If not, sorted array is better since it performs faster in some cases.

public class MinMaxValueOfArray {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] A = {2, 4, 3, 5, 5};
        Arrays.sort(A);
        int min = A[0];
        int max = A[A.length -1];
        System.out.println("Min Value = " + min);        
        System.out.println("Max Value = " + max);
    }
}
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1  
The problem with sorting is that it has an O(n log n) overhead for a O(n) problem. But this is better than the other three "sort the array" answers already given. – Teepeemm Jun 19 '15 at 12:13

You could easily do it with an IntStream and the max() method.

Example

public static int maxValue(final int[] intArray) {
  return IntStream.range(0, intArray.length).map(i -> intArray[i]).max().getAsInt();
}

Explanation

  1. range(0, intArray.length) - To get a stream with as many elements as present in the intArray.

  2. map(i -> intArray[i]) - Map every element of the stream to an actual element of the intArray.

  3. max() - Get the maximum element of this stream as OptionalInt.

  4. getAsInt() - Unwrap the OptionalInt. (You could also use here: orElse(0), just in case the OptionalInt is empty.)

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Example with float:

public static float getMaxFloat(float[] data) {

    float[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(data, data.length);
    Arrays.sort(copy);
    return copy[data.length - 1];
}

public static float getMinFloat(float[] data) {

    float[] copy = Arrays.copyOf(data, data.length);
    Arrays.sort(copy);
    return copy[0];
}
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What about sorting the array? Arrays.sort()

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5  
beware that Arrays.sort() sorts in place - if you still need the original array, you'll need to make a copy of it first. – drevicko Aug 30 '12 at 4:57
10  
That's O(n log n) time... you can find min/max in O(n)... – Alex Reinking Jun 3 '14 at 17:55
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – n.m. Jan 3 '15 at 12:26

protected by Tunaki Nov 24 '15 at 21:34

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