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I have a view that is driving me absolutely crazy..

Table AlarmMsg looks like this:

[TypeID] [smallint] NULL,
[SEFNum] [int] NULL,
[ServerName] [nvarchar](20) NOT NULL,
[DBName] [varchar](20) NOT NULL,
[PointName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
[AppName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,
[Description] [varchar](100) NOT NULL,
[Priority] [tinyint] NOT NULL,
[Value] [float] NOT NULL,
[Limit] [float] NOT NULL,
[Msg] [nvarchar](255) NULL,
[DateStamp] [datetime2](7) NULL,
[UID] [uniqueidentifier] NOT NULL

On top of that AlarmMsg table is a view applied looking like this:

CREATE VIEW AlarmMsgView 
AS
SELECT     TOP (2000) WITH TIES 
    SEFNum, ServerName, DBName, 
    PointName, AppName, Description, 
    Priority, Value, Limit, Msg, 
    DateStamp, UID
FROM      dbo.AlarmMsg WITH (NOLOCK)
ORDER BY DateStamp DESC

This query straight against the table returns the expected ten (10) rows:

SELECT TOP(10) [SEFNum]
FROM [RTIME_Logs].[dbo].[AlarmMsg] 
where [Priority] = 1

The same query against the view returns....nothing (!):

SELECT TOP(10) [SEFNum]
FROM [RTIME_Logs].[dbo].[AlarmMsgView] 
where [Priority] = 1 

The table AlarmMsg contains some 11M+ rows and has a FT index declared on column Msg.

Can someone please tell me what's going on here, I think I'm losing my wits.

share|improve this question
    
What happens if you remove the where clause from the query against the view? Are you definitely getting results? –  Abe Miessler Feb 12 '13 at 23:28
    
Do you mean it returns 0 rows or it does not return at all –  automatic Feb 13 '13 at 0:14
    
If I remove the WHERE clause it does return yes! –  user2066506 Feb 13 '13 at 1:15
    
And yes, while issuing the same query against the view, it returns exactly zero (0) rows. Nada. –  user2066506 Feb 13 '13 at 1:16
2  
No, your outer WHERE clauses' criteria are only considered after the views criteria are already taken into account. You've said "give me 10 randomly selected rows from (give me the 2000 most recent rows (or less) of any priority) where the priority is 1" –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 13 '13 at 7:30

1 Answer 1

NOLOCK causes this issue.

Read this and this.

Basically, NOLOCK came from SQL Server 2000 era. It needs to be forgotten. You have upgraded your SQL Server (I hope), so you need to upgrade your queries. Consider switching to READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT to read data in "unblocked" manner. Read here to decide which isolation level is best for your situation

EDIT: After reading the comments from the author, I think this is the reason:

SQL Server is not doing anything wrong. Treat your view as a subquery of the main query, something like this:

SELECT * FROM (SELECT TOP(2000) col1, col2 FROM aTable ORDER BY Date1 DESC) WHERE priority = 1. 

In this case the query in the brackets will be executed first, and the WHERE clause will be applied to the resulting set

share|improve this answer
    
Nope. Have removed the "WITH (NOLOCK)" directive too. No difference. This is something else. –  user2066506 Feb 13 '13 at 1:50
    
so, in this case there were no "priority one" alarms within the last 2000 alarms (based on DateStamp). What happens is that the TOP(2000) on the view gets executed first and the set is sorted by the DateStamp column in descending order. Within this set in your case there are no priority one alarms (which is great - no alarms - no worries) just add ORDER BY DateStamp DESC to the query from the table itself to get the last date of priority one alarm –  cha Feb 13 '13 at 2:46
    
Thanks for your response cha. However, with that filter "Priority = 1" I would expect to get the 2000 latest alarms which HAS priority one (1) in descending order i.e. the most recent one on top. Why is SQL Server making this so difficult? Or is it even to be classified as a bug? –  user2066506 Feb 13 '13 at 2:54
    
it is not doing anything difficult. Treat your view as a subquery of the main query, something like this: SELECT * FROM (SELECT TOP(2000) col1, col2 FROM aTable ORDER BY Date1 DESC) WHERE priority = 1. In this case the query in the brackets will be executed first, and the WHERE clause will be applied to the resulting set –  cha Feb 13 '13 at 4:28
    
Thanks again cha. I will try that. However this does whole thing does not make sense to me. The way any set based query language should / would interprete this is "give me the most recent 2000 rows of what matches my criteria" ....that shouldn't be THAT complicated right? Anyway thanks for your help cha it has been good. Not your fault I don't understand this ;) –  user2066506 Feb 13 '13 at 4:41

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