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I can find out just about everything about my Jenkins server via the Remote API, but not the list of currently running jobs.

This,

http://my-jenkins/computer/api/json

or

http://my-jenkins/computer/(master)/api/json

Would seem like the most logical choices, but they say nothing (other than the count of jobs) about which jobs are actually running.

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Possible duplicate of serverfault.com/questions/309848/… –  Anew Feb 12 '13 at 23:36
1  
That question is about checking a single build result, I'm looking to inspect what jobs are currently running. Different things in this case. –  Bob Herrmann Feb 13 '13 at 1:19
    
Ahh, my bad. I think I stumbled across a solution. –  Anew Feb 13 '13 at 1:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I have a view defined using View Job Filters Plugin that filters just currently running jobs, then you can use /api/json on the view page to see just the jobs that are running. I also have one for aborted, unstable, etc.

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There is often confusion between jobs and builds in Jenkins, especially since jobs are often referred to as 'build jobs'.

  • Jobs (or 'build jobs' or 'projects') contain configuration that describes what to run and how to run it.
  • Builds are executions of a job. A build contains information about the start and end time, the status, logging, etc.

See https://wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/Building+a+software+project for more information.

If you want the jobs that are currently building (i.e. have one or more running builds), the fastest way is to use the REST API with XPath to filter on colors that end with _anime, like this:

http://jenkins.example.com/api/xml?tree=jobs[name,url,color]&xpath=/hudson/job[ends-with(color/text(),%22_anime%22)]&wrapper=jobs

will give you something like:

<jobs>
  <job>
    <name>PRE_DB</name>
    <url>http://jenkins.example.com/job/my_first_job/</url>
    <color>blue_anime</color>
  </job>
  <job>
    <name>SDD_Seller_Dashboard</name>
    <url>http://jenkins.example.com/job/my_second_job/</url>
    <color>blue_anime</color>
  </job>
</jobs>

Jenkins uses the color field to indicate the status of the job, where the _anime suffix indicates that the job is currently building.

Unfortunately, this won't give you any information on the actual running build. Multiple instances of the job maybe running at the same time, and the running build is not always the last one started.

If you want to list all the running builds, you can also use the REST API to get a fast answer, like this:

http://jenkins.example.com/computer/api/xml?tree=computer[executors[currentExecutable[url]],oneOffExecutors[currentExecutable[url]]]&xpath=//url&wrapper=builds

will give you someting like:

<builds>
  <url>http://jenkins.example.com/job/my_first_job/1412/</url>
  <url>http://jenkins.example.com/job/my_first_job/1414/</url>
  <url>http://jenkins.example.com/job/my_second_job/13126/</url>
</builds>

Here you see a list off all the currently running builds. You will need to parse the URL to separate the job name from the build number. Notice how my_first_job has two builds that are currently running.

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Bit of a hack but I think you can infer what jobs are currently running by looking at the color key in the job objects when you do a GET at /jenkins/api/json?pretty=true. If the 'ball' icon for a given job in Jenkins is animated, we know it's running.

Have a look at the array of job objects in the JSON response:

{
 ...
  "jobs" : [
    {
      "name" : "Test Job 1",
      "url" : "http://localhost:8000/jenkins/job/Test%20Job%201/",
      "color" : "blue"
    },
    {
      "name" : "Test Job 2",
      "url" : "http://localhost:8000/jenkins/job/Test%20Job%202/",
      "color" : "blue_anime"
    }
  ...
}

In this case "color" : "blue_anime" indicates that the job is currently running, and "color" : "blue" indicates that the job is not running.

Hope this helps.

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2  
Thanks, although the balls dont always tell the correct story. In particular if a job is disabled while running (which natuarlly is my case) - the ball is color "disabled" even though the job is currently running. –  Bob Herrmann Feb 13 '13 at 11:48

Marshal the output and filter for "building: true" from the following call to json api on a job with tree to filter out the extraneous stuff (hope this helps):

http://jenkins.<myCompany>.com/job/<myJob>/api/json?pretty=true&depth=2&tree=builds[builtOn,changeSet,duration,timestamp,id,building,actions[causes[userId]]]

will give you something like:

{
  "builds" : [
{
  "actions" : [
    {

    },
    {
      "causes" : [
        {
          "userId" : "cheeseinvert"
        }
      ]
    },
    {

    },
    {

    },
    {

    },
    {

    }
  ],
  "building" : true,
  "duration" : 0,
  "id" : "2013-05-07_13-20-49",
  "timestamp" : 1367958049745,
  "builtOn" : "serverA",
  "changeSet" : {

  }
}, ...
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You can do this with the jenkins tree api, using an endpoint like this:

http://<host>/api/json?tree=jobs[name,lastBuild[building,timestamp]]

You can see what attributes from lastBuild you can use if you access <job-endpoint>/lastBuild/api/json.

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