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I have a comma separated file that contains Employee name,company,years.

An employee may be affiliated to multiple companies.

For eg,

John,Google,2
John,Microsoft,1
James,Tesla,1
James,Apple,5

I have retrieved the information using the java scanner

scanner.useDelimiter(",|\\n");
    while (scanner.hasNext()) {
        String line = scanner.next()

I am new to Java and I am trying to insert the above in a sorted order (using experience as sorting criteria) using an array of linked lists or array of array. So

employee -> Company1 -> Company2.... (ordered by employee experience)

So in the above example, it would be:

John->Microsoft->google
James->Tesla->Apple

Can someone point me to the right direction?

NOTE: If the experience is same, it doesnt matter which company comes first.

share|improve this question
    
There is a contradiction in the example you provided, because for John you sorted in ascending order while in James you did the opposite !? –  iTech Feb 13 '13 at 1:27
    
edited my question iTech. I am kinda new to java ..i dont understand comparable –  Micheal Feb 13 '13 at 1:33
    
See my updated answer –  iTech Feb 13 '13 at 1:43
    
Do you care about the order of the actual people, as opposed to the companies that that person has worked at? –  sharakan Feb 13 '13 at 2:54
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use this class for Person

public class Person {

@Getter @Setter
private String name;

@Getter @Setter
private TreeMap<String, String> companyExperience;

public Person(){
    companyExperience = new TreeMap<String, String>();
}

}

Using the experience as key in a TreeMap will automatically sort the companies for a Person in ascending order.

Your main class shoud look like this

public class App 
{
    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
        HashMap<String, Person> persons = new HashMap<String, Person>();

        BufferedReader br = null;
        try {
            br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Users\\Public Administrator\\test.txt"));
        } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        String line = null;

        try {
            while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
                String[] fields = line.split(",");
                String personName = fields[0];
                Person existingPerson = persons.get(personName);
                if (existingPerson==null){
                    Person newPerson = new Person();
                    newPerson.setName(personName);
                    newPerson.getCompanyExperience().put(Integer.parseInt(fields[2])+fields[1], fields[1]);
                    persons.put(personName, newPerson);
                } else{
                    existingPerson.getCompanyExperience().put(Integer.parseInt(fields[2])+fields[1], fields[1]);
                }
             }
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }    

        //output
        Iterator<Map.Entry<String, Person>> entries = persons.entrySet().iterator();
        while (entries.hasNext()) {
            Map.Entry<String, Person> entry = entries.next();
            Person _person = entry.getValue();
            System.out.print(_person.getName());

            Iterator<Map.Entry<String, String>> companyExperiences = _person.getCompanyExperience().entrySet().iterator();
            while (companyExperiences.hasNext()) {
                Map.Entry<String, String> companyExperience = companyExperiences.next();

                System.out.print(" > "+companyExperience.getValue());
            }
            System.out.println();

        }
    }
}

I've tested it and looks pretty, pretty good to me.

By the way, the @Getter and @Setter annotations are from the Lombok project. You can either use it or create your own getters/setters.

share|improve this answer
    
@Micheal unless I'm missing something, this solution will not handle the case of the same person having two equal length jobs, eg: James,Google,1 James,Apple,1 Give it a try. –  sharakan Feb 14 '13 at 0:28
    
@sharakan You are right. I've fixed it by using the experience+company (now, a String) as key of the TreeMap. Now it works in all cases. Good point. –  mrod Feb 14 '13 at 8:33
    
Now you have a similar problem, when you've worked at the same company twice for the same amount of time. You really don't want a Set for this, as items should not be considered unique. –  sharakan Feb 14 '13 at 13:43
add comment

read your file with readLine() and use split to get each field of your data, e.g.:

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("FileName"));
String line = null;
ArrayList<Person> list = new ArrayList<Person>();

while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
    String[] fields = line.split(",");
    list.add(new Person(fields[0], fields[1], Integer.parseInt(fields[2])));
 } 

You can then save your data in ArrayList that takes a custom class e.g. Person that stores the person's information and implements Comparable where you do the sorting logic.

If you need to group your data by the person name, you might consider having a Hashtable where the key is the person name and the value is ArrayList of experience.

You can define a class for your data, e.g.

class Person implements Comparable<Person> {
    private String name;
    private String company;
    private int experience;

    public Person(String name, String company, int experience) {

        this.name = name;
        this.company = company;
        this.experience = experience;
    }

    public int getExperience() {
        return experience;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Person person) {
        return new Integer(experience).compareTo(person.getExperience());
    }
}

The to sort your list just call Collections.sort(list);; however this list will contain all the data so modify the code to group the data by the employee name and have a list per each employee

share|improve this answer
    
-1 This doesn't give the results that OP wants. Since you've got a Person object per line in the file, you'll have two objects per person name and thus the sort can split up the same person. eg: your sorted list will have something like John:Microsoft:1, James:Tesla:1, John:Google:2, James:Apple:5 –  sharakan Feb 13 '13 at 3:48
    
Seems you did not read the last two lines of my answer. –  iTech Feb 13 '13 at 3:51
    
Correct, I missed those, just read the code! My mistake. You were leaving the final step of getting to his Emp->Comp1->Comp2 structure as an exercise for the reader? –  sharakan Feb 13 '13 at 4:13
    
Can someone point me to the right direction? this was the question and the solution from what I suggested is clear. In fact your answer to the question has a serious flaw, but I do not have time to comment on it –  iTech Feb 13 '13 at 4:16
add comment

For your purposes, it sounds like you really want an object to represent a Person, who has some amount of Experience. Since your input source has the data denormalized, easiest way to do that is to populate a Map<String,Person> as you parse your file:

scanner.useDelimiter(",|\\n");
while (scanner.hasNext()) {
    String line = scanner.next();
    String[] fields = line.split(",");

    String name = fields[0];
    Person person = map.get(name);
    if (person == null) {
        person = new Person(name);
        map.put(name, person);
    }
    person.addJob(fields[1], Integer.parseInt(fields[2]));
}

List<Person> people = new ArrayList<Person>(map.values());

After this process, you'll end up with a List of People, in no particular order. For each Person, since you want to keep their job's in order sorted by experience, you'd need to implement Person.addJob in such a way as to keep it ordered. A SortedSet is a really nice way to do this, but you can't insert duplicates, and since you want to sort by experience, and a person could've been at two jobs the same amount of time you need to use an alternate approach. There's several ways to do this, but without making assumptions about your data I'd suggest keeping a sorted List of Job objects:

class Person {
    private final List<Job> jobs = new LinkedList<Job>();

    // Constructor, etc... 

    public void addJob(String companyName, int yearsOfExperience) {
        Job newJob = new Job(companyName, yearsOfExperience);
        int insertionIndex = Collections.binarySearch(jobs, newJob);
        if (insertionIndex < 0) {
            insertionIndex = (-(insertionIndex) - 1);
        }
        jobs.add(insertionIndex, newJob);
    }
}

and finally, a Job should implement Comparable<Job>, so that you can look it up:

class Job implements Comparable<Job> {
    private final String companyName;
    private final int yearsOfExperience;

    // Constructor, etc... 

    public int compareTo(Job otherJob) {
        return Integer.compare(yearsOfExperience,otherJob.yearsOfExperience);
    }
}

That bit of trickery in Person.addJob will keep the List always sorted by the 'natural order' of Job. (see Collections.binarySearch).

share|improve this answer
    
@ITech You mentioned that this solution has a 'serious flaw'. Hopefully at some point you have time to point it out to me. –  sharakan Feb 13 '13 at 13:04
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